...

Head Start 2012-2013

by user

on
Category: Documents
43

views

Report

Comments

Transcript

Head Start 2012-2013
Head Start 2012-2013
Phyllis Hollinshead – Principal/Director
HEAD START ACT
GOVERNING BOARD
POLICY COUNCIL
HEAD START DIRECTOR
SUPERINTENDENT
PROGRAM
GOVERNANCE
MANAGEMENT
SYSTEMS
Program Planning
Ongoing
Monitoring
Human Resources
Communication
Record Keeping
ELIGIBILITY
RECRUITMENT
SELECTION
ENROLLMENT
ATTENDANCE
CHILD HEALTH
AND SAFETY
FAMILY &
COMMUNITY
ENGAGEMENT
HEALTH &
DENTAL
TEACHER
CO-TEACHER
NUTRITION
STUDENT
TRANSPORTATION
FISCAL
INTEGRITY
CHILD
DEVELOPMENT
&
EDUCATION
SCHOOL READINESS
CURRICULUM
DISABILITIES
Organizational Structure
MENTAL HEALTH
Governing Body & Policy Council
Policy Council
School Board
Governance and Management Responsibilities *
Head Start staff can use Appendix A as a quick reference for
understanding the responsibilities of the governing body and
management staff. This resource also explains the specific decisionmaking of each policy group and management staff.
* See Supportive Documentation (SD) #1
 Written Plans -
See SD #2
 Program Information Report - See SD #3
 Self Assessment - See SD #4
 Community Assessment - See SD #5
 Head Start Audit 2009-10
 Comprehensive Needs Assessment/Strategic Plan
School Readiness in Programs Serving Preschool Children
ACF-PI-HS-11-04
U.S.
U. S.
Department
DEPARTMENT
ofOF
Health
HEALTH
and Human
AND HUMAN
Services SERVICES
ERSEA
Eligibility, Recruitment, Selection, Enrollment,
Attendance
ACF
U.S. DEPARTMENT
OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES
ERSEA
Eligibility
Recruitment
Selection
Enrollment
Attendance
1.Log No. ACF-xx-xx-11-04
2.Issuance Date:11/08/2011
3. Originating Office: Office of Head Start
4. Key Words: Eligibility, Recruitment, Selection, Enrollment
Head Start Eligibility, Recruitment,
Selection, Enrollment, Attendance
Lisa Sutton
Licensed Social Worker
ERSEA Certified
Adriane Cruz
Family Services
Assistant
The established process for the recruitment of families is
determined by the Head Start team by the following:
Is the child
age eligible?
YES
Is the child
categorically
eligible?
Yes
Is the child
income eligible?
Yes
No
Categorical Eligibility applies
only to a family receiving SSI or
TANF benefits, classified as
homeless, a child in foster care,
or an expectant mother with no
other means of child care
45CFR 1305.2(1)
Sec. 642 (c)(B) of the Head Start Act
45 CFR 1305.7©
No
Recommend
to another PreK program or
place on the
priority list
Enroll into the
program
QUALIFYING CATEGORIES:
NUMBER OF POINTS FOR CATEGORIES
CHILD RECEIVING SSI
1000
1000
1000
CHILD RECEIVING TANF
AGE ELIGIBLE CHILD OF EXPECTANT MOTHER WITH NO
OTHER MEANS OF CHILD CARE
FOSTER CARE
INCOME ELIGIBLE ( Please see the attached point system)
AGE 3
AGE 4
TRANSFER FROM OTHER HEAD START
DIAGNOSED DISABILITY MILD (SPEECH OR LANGUAGE)
DIAGNOSED DISABILITY MODERATE (EMOTIONAL
DISTURBANCE, AUTISM, DEVELOPMENTAL DALAYS, OTHER
HEATH IMPAIRMENTS)
DIAGNOSED DISABILITY SEVERE (MENTAL RETARDATION,
TRAUMATIC BRAIN INJURY, VISUAL AND HEARING
IMPAIRMENT, SERIOUS ORTHOPEDIC IMPAIRMENT, SERIOUS
OTHER HEATH IMPAIRMENT)
FAMILY VIOL, SUBSTANCE ABUSE, INCARCERATION, EVICTION,
CRISIS
EMOTIONAL ISSUES
1000
505
20
30
30
20
40
60
40
PARENT ENROLLED IN SCHOOL, WORK PROGRAM
30
10
20
30
MEDICAID, CHIPS, FOOD STAMPS AND WIC RECIPIENT
40
COMMUNITY REFERRAL
SINGLE PARENT HOUSEHOLD
• Regular registration process for Head
Start begins at Round Up in April for
the upcoming school year and is
ongoing until all vacancies are filled.
• Selection process for vacancies begins
with a phone call to perspective
families beginning the enrollment
process in to the Head Start Program.
PRIORITY LIST
CALLING SYSTEM
BLUE
Called; no response
Red
Called; do not wish to
stay on the priority list
or enrolled in another
program
Enrolled into the Head
Start
Green
Family
Size
Income Eligible
100%
(80 pts)
Low income
75%
(90 pts)
Low Income
50%
(100 pts)
Low income
25%
1
11,170 - 8,377
8,377 - 5,584
5,584 - 2,793
2,793 - 0
2
15,130 - 11,347
11,347 - 7,564
7,564 - 3,783
3,783 - 0
3
19,090 - 14,317
14,317 - 9,544
9,544 - 4,773
4,773 - 0
4
23,050 - 17,287
17,287 - 11,524
11,524 - 5,763
5,763 - 0
5
27,010 - 20,257
20,257 - 13,504
13,504 - 6,753
6,753 - 0
6
30,970 - 23,227
23,227 - 15,484
15,484 – 7,743
7,743 - 0
7
34,930 - 26,157
26,157 – 17,434
17,434 – 8,733
8,733 - 0
8
38,890 – 29,167 29,167 – 19,444
19,444 - 9723
9,723 - 0
(70 pts)
Family
Size
(45 pts)
Income Eligible
130%
(55 pts)
Low income
120%
(65 pts)
Low Income
110%
1
14,520 - 13,404
13,404 - 12,288
12,288 - 11,171
2
19, 670 - 18,157
18,156 - 16,644
16, 644 - 15131
3
24, 817 - 22,909
22,909 - 21,000
20, 999- 19,090
4
29,965 - 27,661
27,660 - 25,356
25,355 - 23,051
5
35,113 - 32,413
32,412 - 29,712
29,711 - 27,011
6
40,261 - 37,165
37,164 - 34,068
34,067 - 30,971
7
45,409 – 41,917
41,916 -38,424
38,423 – 34,931
8
50,557 - 46,669
46,668 – 42,780
42,779 – 38,891
Over income families are accepted into
the Head Start Program only after the
priority list has been exhausted and the
program has meet the requirements
regarding pregnant women and the
requirements regarding 10% disability.
Enrollment Day & Screening
2011-12 Head Start Enrollment
By Month
197
195
194
194
193
193
192
192
191
Aug/Sept
Oct
Nov
Dec
Jan
Feb
Mar
Apr
May/June
2011-12 Head Start Average Daily
Attendance
By Month
96.94
94.83
94.82
94.40
93.85
93.82
94.73
93.71
92.80
Aug/Sept
Oct
Nov
Dec
Jan
Feb
Mar
Apr
May/June
Family and Community
Engagement/ Social Services
 Performance Standards 1304
 Collaboratively work with parents to
identify and continually access services
and resources
 Help families develop and implement
individualized Family Partnership Goals.
 Assist in contacting community
resources
 Home Visits as needed
Family and Community
Engagement/ Social Services
 Additional Duties

Foster Grandparents Campus Coordinator
 Play Therapy Coordinator
Child Health and Safety
Safe Physical Environments
 The program ensures physical environments are
safe for children, parents, and staff.
Child Health and Safety
Safe Physical Environments
•
•
•
•
Head Start facilities must meet applicable state and
local licensing requirements; fire, health, and safety
regulations.
This also includes laws regarding environmental
hazards.
These regulations ensure that the physical
environment supports the delivery of high quality
services to children and families.
Proper attention paid to the issues of safety and
sanitation protects children’s health and keeps them
free from injury.
Child Health and Safety
Safe Physical Environments
 Grantee and delegate agencies operating center-based
programs must establish and implement policies and
procedures to respond to emergencies. At a minimum,
these must include:
• Posted policies and plans of action for emergencies
that require rapid response of staff and immediate
attention
• Emergency contact information for each child
• Posted emergency evacuation routes and other safety
procedures for emergencies (e.g., fire or weather
related) which are practiced regularly.
Building Emergency Response Team
 The campus Building Emergency Response Team
manual is located at the clerk/receptionist desk.
This is published by the District for campuses to
follow in all types of emergencies.
 In addition, the following plans are specific to our
school.
Emergency
Quick Reference Chart
Situation
Signal
Teacher Does:
Related Service
Personnel Does:
Principal or
Designee
Other
Fire
Bell
1.
1.
Go out nearest exit with
children
Do not take children
assigned to you back to
their classroom
Move children at least 100
feet away from building
1.
Speech Therapists
will assist E101 and
W201
Go to the nearest weather
safe room
Do not take children
assigned to you back to
classroom.
Monitor to insure everyone
gets into a safe location.
All specialist will
assist principal or
designee
Notify office of children
assigned to you.
Stay in your area
Initiate campus wide search
for lost child
All specialist will
assist principal or
designee
Stay in your area
Find a safe place out of site
and remain quite.
Notify office of children
assigned to you.
Lock all entry door and
control entry and exits of
visitors.
All specialist will
assist principal or
designee
Lead everyone to predetermined location
All specialist will
assist principal or
designee
2.
3.
Go out classroom back
door with your children.
Take class roll sheet
Move children at least 100
feet away from building
2.
3.
Announcement
Disaster
1.
2.
Child Find
Lockdown
Evacuation of
Total Campus
Announcement
Announcement
Announcement
1.
Go to the nearest weather
safe room
Take class roll sheet and
flashlight
If outside return to
classroom
2.
If inside stay in classroom
3.
Lock your back gate
4.
Lock your back door
1.
If outside return to
classroom
2.
If inside stay in classroom
3.
Close all curtains cover
doors and windows with
your black shade.
4.
Turn off lights and be quite.
Follow instructions from office
1.
2.
1.
2.
1.
2.
3.
Follow instructions from office
2.
Monitor to insure
everyone gets out
safely
Move at least 100 feet
from building.
*Disclaimer: This does not supersede any written procedures. This is meant as a quick reference guide.
**Note: All staff will be instructed when it is safe to return to work stations and/or resume normal activities.
Child Find Office Procedures
Team
Member
Member
Duty
Office
Hollinshead
Pettigrew/ Coordinates overall search efforts
De Los
including police backup if needed
Santos
Internal Search
Hollinshead
Sutton
Conduct internal search of
building
Containment 1
Gulledge
Martinez
Monitor north & south side of
building & report observations
Containment 2
Harden
Cruz
Monitor east & west side of
building & report observations
Note: Any of the teams may recruit help as needed, i.e., custodians, parents, etc.
Updated 10/04/12
Child Health and Safety
Safe Physical Environments
 Safety is everyone’s business! To ensure that facilities are safe,
monthly safety inspections must be done and include at a
minimum the following:
• General Indoor Areas
• Toys and Equipment
• Hallways and Stairs
• Kitchen and Food Preparation
and Storage Areas
• Bathrooms
• Active Play Areas Including
Playgrounds
• Emergency Preparedness
• Trip Hazards
• Maintenance
• Supervision
• Other Hazards
Child Health and Safety
Transportation and
Supervision
The Process Begins
 Denton I.S.D. is dedicated to provide the best possible






transportation for all our assigned Special Needs students.
How it begins:
When a person puts in an application:
A Federal background check is completed.
The training department conducts an interview and if it is
decided to hire the person, That person is sent for a physical
and drug screening.
If they pass this section then paperwork is submitted to
Human Resources and the person goes for fingerprints.
After all this is completed the person returns to the training
department to begin training. There is not a set amount of
hours for the training, but there is a set amount of information
that must be covered.
It Includes:










Drivers are assigned 13 videos with work sheets and test.
Monitors are assigned 9 videos and work sheets and test.
Both are required to complete:
The Student Transportation Procedures Manual [91 pg.] with
tests.
Student Safety Workbook [21pg] with test.
Special Needs Scenario Workbook/quiz [15 pg.]
Bus Attendant Orientation workbook/quizzes [33 pg.]
Training with a specific trainer on the installation and
operation of equipment on a school bus.
Student Access Card Program.
Student Safety Class with a Student Safety officer which
includes power point presentation, question and answer, and
hands on paperwork. [3 1/2 hrs.]
..and it continues…
 A Special Needs Class with the Special Needs Supervisor.
Covers what to expect from students, laws and regulations,
scenarios, methods of redirecting behaviors, methods to
working with parents, loading and unloading procedures and
evacuation procedures, Written question and answer quiz.
[4hrs].

New drivers are assigned to a route and ride with a trainer
during their training to become familiar with the route, the
students and how to handle whatever situations that arise.
Between the routes they have behind the wheel training and
assistance with preparing for their written tests with the
Texas Department of Transportation as well as covering all
the afore listed material.
 New monitors are assigned to ride on specific Special Needs
routes to experience first hand what occurs on the routes and
how to work with the students and equipment. This will
consist of two to four various routes over a couple of weeks.
Assignments:
 There are several variables to consider when
making a route assignment:
 The personality, skills and mind set of the new
person needs to be a fit with the specific needs
and personality of all the students on the route.
 Compatibility with the other route team
member with the ability to form a strong team
working relationship with their partner.
 The capability of working with parents and
campus staff.
Releasing Students







Precautions are in place to ensure students are released to the
correct person.
Parents receive a form to list all persons that have permission to
receive their student. The formed is copied with a copy going into
the route box and a copy into the students file.
The route teams are trained to have the parents call the Special
Needs office when they want to add someone to the list and a new
form is provided to add that person. Personal contacts with parents
also ensures there is a current list.
Upon arrival at a stop location and an unknown person is present,
they are asked to provide identification and their names are
compared to the authorized Receiver’s list.
When their names are not on the list a call is made to the dispatch
office and a call is made to the parent to verify the waiting person.
Without proper verification the student remains on the bus until
there is parent notification.
In the worst case scenario, the student is returned to the
Transportation Department to wait until they can be released to the
parent.
Student Information
 Each Route is supplied with a route box that contains:
 A binder with information sheets on each student.










Including an Arial map of the mobile home parks,
apartments and any unusual locations to ensure that the
students location will be found correctly.
Route Sheets with student name and address.
Student Roster.
A seating chart.
An evacuation plan.
A seizure record.
A Driver’s Notes for the route sheet.
An Authorized Receivers form.
A Change of Drop-Off and Pick-Up form.
Area map.
Other misc. information sheets
Bus Maintenance:
 The on site shop maintains a scheduled
maintenance and repair of all buses.
 The bus team completes a Vehicle Condition
Report before and after each route.
 The pre-trip inspection report consists of 44
points of consideration, while the post trip has 52
points.
 If there are any issues with the bus the report is
turned into the maintenance department
immediately for follow up.
Child Development and Education
Sacha Harden, M.Ed., Education Specialist
•School Readiness
•Curriculum Overview
•Individualizing
•Quality Teaching and Learning
TEA Certifications:
Principal
Generalist EC-4
Special Ed PK-12
School
Readiness Act of
2007 ACF-Pi-HS11-04
The Initiative began in
2007 and was launched
11/8/2011
School Readiness is a top
priority for programs to
contribute to the readiness
of all the children they
serve. The Office of Head
Start's definition of school
readiness is that "children
are ready for school,
families are ready to
support their children's
learning, and schools are
ready for children".
The framework (HS CDELF) is
aligned with the Revised Texas
Prekindergarten Guidelines
(See SD #6)
School Readiness Goals were
developed across the following
domains:
•Language & Literacy
•Cognition & Knowledge
•Physical Well-being and Motor
Development
•Social & Emotional Development
•Approaches to Learning
School Readiness goals were aligned
with Texas Prekindergarten
Guidelines (See SD #7)
School Readiness Outcomes
2011-2012 Brief Report – See SD #8
Presently, we are recruiting parents to serve on the
school readiness board for this school year. The
school readiness education board will work
together on obtaining parent input in updating
goals 2012-2013.
Child Development and Education
Ongoing Monitoring begins at
enrollment.
All students are screened using DIAL4. After analyzing data, teachers and
parents collaborate and write goals for
each child.
The goal sheet is called the IDP
Individualized Development Plan
Teachers give each student a code that
is reflected on the lesson plan to show
when and where individualization
occurs.
Students are assessed daily. Data
collected is placed in the student
portfolio.
•
•
•
IDP
Portfolio Assessment Tool
DISD Prekindergarten Report Card (every 6
weeks)
•
School Readiness Outcomes (quarterly)
See SD #9
Child Health and
Safety
C. Tina Stevens, RN
Health Specialist
Child Health and Safety
Physical Prior to Enrollment
SNAP
Immunization Tracking
Vision and Hearing
Screenings Completed
Within 45 Days of
Enrollment
Medical Home/Dental Exams
100% of Head Start students from 2009-2012
will have had a medical home by year end.
 Medical home is not a building but a model for delivering
primary care that is accessible, continuous, comprehensive,
family-centered, compassionate, and culturally effective to all
children and youth, including children and youth with
special health care needs.
 Goal -medical and non-medical needs of the patient are met.
Medical Home/Dental Exams
 A medical home may help the family/patient access,
coordinate, and understand specialty care, educational
services, out-of-home care, family support, and other public
and private community services that are important for the
overall health of the child and family.
100% of our
Head Start Students will have a dental
exam before year end.
Child Health & Safety
Physical Prior Enrollment – See SD #10
SNAP (School Nurse Assessment Program) is a nursing
based software program designed especially for School
Nurses that is utilized to maintain and monitor students
health issues, health history, and state required screenings.
It also utilizes NANDA diagnoses for IHPs (Individual Health
Plans) , maintains the student’s safety, and has multiple
additional attributes to aide the School Nurse in providing
her multiple professional services. Denton ISD upgrades
SNAP frequently to keep up-to-date with Texas State Laws
and the frequent changes in Health Care and the nursing
profession.
IMMUNIZATION Tracking is recorded and maintained by
the Denton ISD’s use of eSchool Database program. This
secure program has great tracking attributes that aide the
School Nurse in complying with Texas State Immunization
Requirements and guidelines in addition to other record
keeping services.
 Faculty
Disabilities Services
Dr. Johnnie Pettigrew
Educational Diagnostician
In-Kind Services
TEA Certifications:
Principal
Educational Diagnostician
Elementary Education 1st-8th Grade
Language Learning Disabilities
Kindergarten
Prekindergarten
Early Childhood Special Education
Disabilities Services
 10% of students served must be
students with an identified disability
 For Denton ISD Head Start that
equals 20 children.
Disabilities Services
 Currently we have 19 children
identified before enrollment
 An additional 1 must be added by
December
Disabilities Services
 How? Through required screening
and follow-up rescreening of
developmental areas
 Parent referral
 Student Early Intervention (campus
Response To Intervention program +)
Disabilities Services
 A child with a disability is any child identified under
one of the 13 IDEA categories
•
Autism
•
Auditory
Impairment
•
Deaf Blind
•
Emotionally
Disturbed
•
Intellectually
Disabled
•
Multiply Disabled
•
Non-Categorical
Early Childhood
•
Other Health
Impaired
•
Orthopedically
Impaired
•
Speech Impaired
•
Specific Learning
Disability
•
Traumatic Brain
Injury
•
Visually Impaired
Disabilities Services
• Currently we are serving 18 children
identified as Speech Impaired and 1
child identified as Orthopedically
Impaired
Additional Duties
• Conduct ongoing program analysis and
generate reports
• Conduct data analysis and prepare final
summative report
• Conduct analysis of the Written Plan for
Disabilities on an annual basis to assure
compliance with local operating
guidelines, state regulations, and federal
law See SD #11
Head Start Nutrition Program
In Collaboration with the National
School Lunch Program and the National
School Breakfast Program
Traliece Bradford, MS, RD, LD
Nutrition Coordinator
Denton ISD
Meeting Nutritional Needs and
Feeding Requirements
 Receive Federal and State Regulations and Guidance
from
 United States Department of Agriculture (USDA)
 Texas Department of Agriculture (TDA)

National School Lunch Program (NSLP) and National School
Breakfast Program (NSBP)
 Food Based Menu Planning Meal Pattern
 Meat/Meat Alternate, Fruits, Vegetables, Grains, and
Milk
 Serve only option
Pre-Kindergarten Meal Pattern Chart
(Modified)
Food Component Food Items
Ages 1-2
Ages 3-4
Meat/Meat Alt.
Lean meat,
poultry, or fish
1 oz. eq.
1 ½ oz. eq.
Low Fat, Low Na+
Cheese
1 oz. eq.
1 ½ oz. eq.
Large egg(s)
½
¾
Cooked dry beans
or peas
¼ cup
3/8
Vegetables or
Fruits
2 < servings
(varied)
½ cup a day
½ cup a day
Grains
Enriched or whole
grain
5 servings/wk
8 servings/wk
Milk
Fluid as a beverage ¾ cup or 6 fl. oz.
cup
¾ cup or 6 fl. oz.
Reference: NSLP Handbook: Administrator’s Reference Manual, TDA-updated
August 2012
Meal Service
 Meal Preparation, Delivery, and Serving
 Preparation and Portions
 Hot/Cold Delivery Carts
 Family-Style
 Meal Scheduling
 Standard
 Adjustments
Accommodating Children with Special
Dietary Needs and Disabilities
 USDA Regulations require that school districts comply with Section
504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973. This act prohibits discrimination
on the basis of disability.
 Denton Public Schools shall operate the school meal program so
that it will be considered readily accessible and usable by qualified
disabled students.
PROCEDURE:
 Food Service staff are required to make substitutions or modifications
to the meal requirement for those participants with disabilities who are
unable to consume the meals offered at no extra charge to the student.
Accommodating Children with Special
Dietary Needs and Disabilities
PROCEDURE (continued):
 A licensed physician’s medical statement is required and kept on file.
The statement must be based on the regulatory criteria for “disabled
person” and contain a finding that the disability restricts the
participant’s diet.
 If the disabled student requires only textural modification to the meal,
the medical statement is recommended, but not required.
 Furnishings must be acceptable and usable for disabled students . The
school may choose to use aides to assist students. It is not the
responsibility of the Child Nutrition Department to assist the child in
eating his/her meal.
Accommodating Children with Special
Dietary Needs and Disabilities
PROCEDURE:
 Students who have severe allergies where ingestion of the food would result in
life-threatening anaphylaxis will be accommodated through menu
modification.
 School nurse send student allergy lists to the Child Nutrition Coordinator.
 The Child Nutrition Coordinator determines whether or not the allergy is life-
threatening. This may require communication with a nurse, physician, or
parent.
 A special diet or a menu item modification is planned, if needed, by the Child
Nutrition Coordinator and discussed with the cafeteria manager.
References
 NSLP Handbook: Administrator’s Reference Manual,
TDA-updated August 2012 at www.squaremeals.org
 USDA Food and Nutrition Service.
http://www.fns.usda.gov/cnd/
 Denton ISD Child Nutrition Program.
http://www.dentonisd.org/page/501
Mental Health Services
Dr. Rebecca Julius
Mental Health Services
 Offered through collaboration of Mental Health
Specialist with Ann Windle LSSP and UNT Play
Therapy Department
 Services address the
 Child
 Parent
 Teacher/Staff
Mental Health Services
 Child
 Classroom observations and interventions based on
concerns identified by parent and/or teachers
 Referrals (through the teachers) for more intensive
ongoing therapy through the UNT Play Therapy
PLAY THERAPY
An early mental health intervention for low-income
children referred for behavioral problems.
Child Centered Play Therapy (CCPT) is provided to
students who have been referred by the teacher for socialemotional or behavioral concerns. CCPT is a
developmentally appropriate, culturally sensitive
intervention. Strong research shows the benefits of its use
in public schools.
Play therapists are all advanced doctoral interns at UNT
under the supervision of the director of the Center for Play
Therapy at UNT
Play Therapy takes place twice per week for
approximately 10 weeks.
Mental Health Services
 Parent
 Address parent concerns regarding classroom and
home setting
 Parent consultation and referral
 Literature/written materials
 Parent Training and Support Meetings
Some Topics From 2011-12
Some Topics For 2012-13
Family Stressors
Understanding Your Child’s
Behavior
Encouraging Children to Learn
Behavior Strategies for Parents
Services for Special Needs
Children
Parent/Family Collaboration
Mental Health Services
 Teachers
 Teacher/Staff Trainings
 Teacher Consultations
 Classroom Observations and Interventions
 Professional Materials/Research
 Building Posters
 Encouraging Communication and Collaboration
with Parents
Family Engagement and
Volunteer Coordinator
Julia LoSoya
Certified Diabetes Trainer
Family Engagement and
Volunteer Coordinator
 Responsibilities
 Conduct Survey to Identify Parent Interests for
Parent Classes
 Coordinate Parent Classes
 Recruit and Track Volunteers and Their Hours
 Facilitate Identification of Policy Council
Members
 Facilitate Parent Committee
Family Engagement
Parent Classes Offered
WHERE:
TIME:
WHEN:
Ann Windle Parent Room or Activity
Center
Starts 8:30 am
Throughout the School Year During the
Week or on the Week-ends
Family Engagement
 Back to School Fiesta:
Get a Head Start: Go to School
 ESL ( English Second Language)
Twice a week Sept.- May / GED Assistance
 Adult Literacy
Family Engagement
 Classes in conjunction with Texas A&M AgriLIFE
Extension Service
- Step Up & Scale Down! (Zumba)
- Helping With Children’s Behavior
- Turkey Talk
- Family Traditions
- Three Easy Bites That Won’t Weigh You Down
- Do Well, Be Well with Diabetes
- How to Save Money when you don’t have a Dime to
Spare
- Healthy Marriage
- ZUMBA – Exercise Class for Parents
Family Engagement
 AWSYC - SCHOOL WIDE ACTIVITIES (Sept.- May)
- Grandparents Day
-
Panda Dance
Make It - Take It
F.R.E.D. (Father’s Reading Every Day)
Celebration with F.R.E.D.
M&M’S (Mom’s & Math & Science)
Rodeo Day
Animal Fair Day/Field Day
Head Start Volunteer Hours
2011-12 Volunteer Hours
2861.76
2731.4
2464.98
2172.01
2298.4
2422.19
2378.6
Apr.
May
2058.4
1869.62
Sept.
Oct.
Nov.
Dec.
Jan.
Feb.
Mar.
Head Start Volunteers
2011-12 Volunteer Hours Value @ $12.50 per hour
$35,772.00
$34,142.50
$30,812.25
$30,277.38
$29,732.50
Apr.
May
$28,730.00
$27,150.13
$25,730.00
$23,370.25
Sept.
Oct.
Nov.
Dec.
Jan.
Feb.
Mar.
Resources
Mary Helen Martin, Director of Elementary Education
 Head Start Act
 FY 2013 Office of Head Start Monitoring Protocol
Fly UP