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Syllabus THE UNIVERSITY OF TEXAS AT BROWNSVILLE College of Education

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Syllabus THE UNIVERSITY OF TEXAS AT BROWNSVILLE College of Education
THE UNIVERSITY OF TEXAS AT BROWNSVILLE
College of Education
Syllabus
Conceptual Framework & Knowledge Base
The conceptual framework contains four core
concepts, which are themes through which we
organize and deliver our programs; hence they are
central to our vision of professional educators and
scholars. These include:




Interculturalism
Interrelatedness
Inquiry
Pedagogical Leadership
Mission Statement



To prepare highly skilled professionals to assume roles and positions in teaching, research, educational
leadership, and human development.
To provide undergraduate and graduate programs based on proven best practice, knowledge acquisition,
reflective inquiry, critical thinking, and respect for the cultural and linguistically diverse learner.
To continuously develop a dynamic local, state, national, and international, dimension that promotes
innovations and contributes to scientific educational, economic, and social change.
Vision Statement
The vision of the College of Education is to be consistently recognized as fully-accredited and as a nationally
and internationally respected college in the areas of science, mathematics, educational technology and
intercultural dimension (language, literacy, culture and interdisciplinary studies in regard to preparing
teachers, counselors, administrators, educational researchers, and professional at all levels, not only for the
school system but for other economical and service areas which require training, human resources,
development and life-long learning.
Teacher preparation programs of the College of Education will be central to the mission of the University and
will have national prominence. It will be at the forefront in programs for English Language Learners and,
through teacher preparation, P-16 and life-long education initiatives will be a model for helping to close the
student achievement gap.
All of these will require the COE to be noted for the quality of its graduates, the scholarship of its faculty, and
the leadership and service they provide to the local, regional, and national educational communities in the
previously mentioned areas.
Note: Please be advised that the College of Education conducts ongoing research regarding the effectiveness
of the programs. You will receive one survey in the final semester prior to graduation regarding the
operations of the unit during your time here. A second survey will occur within one year following graduation
from or completion of a program, and will be sent to your employer. This survey will focus on the
preparation received at UTB. Please remember that your response to these surveys is critical to UTB
excellence.
College of Education
Department of Teaching, Learning and Innovation
EDTC 6358: Theory and Practice of E-Learning
SYLLABUS
Spring 2013
Prerequisite: Must be within 6 hours of completion of E-Learning Certificate program.
Approval of Program Coordinator.
Instructor:
Cheng-Chang (Sam) PAN, Ph.D., PMP
Phone:
(956) 882-7805
Email:
[email protected]
Office:
EDBC 1.306
Office Hours:
Monday (10:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m.), Wednesday (10:00 a.m. to 11:00 p.m.),
& Thursday (2:00 p.m. to 4:00 p.m.)
Other days: By appointment
Class Location:
This class is offered fully online. Please log in to:
http://myutb.blackboard.com to access, and participate in, the course.
Class Day
& Time:
Please log in to the course and carefully review the course Syllabus,
Calendar, and Projects pages to become familiar with the course
requirements and deadlines. Please contact me if you have any questions.
COURSE CATALOG DESCRIPTION
This is the capstone course for the E-Learning Graduate Certificate Program. Students are
expected to apply previously learned skills and knowledge to plan and manage an e-learning
project in a real-life context. Prerequisites: Must be within 6 hours of completion of program.
Approval of Program Coordinator. Lec. 3., Cr. 3.
REQUIRED RESOURCES
Reference Textbook
Title: The Systematic Design of Instruction (6th ed.)
Authors: Walter Dick, Lou Carey, & James O. Carey
Year: 2005
Publisher: Pearson
ISBN: 0-205-41274-2
Orientation
An orientation is scheduled on January 19 (Thursday), 2012 at 7:30 PM in Blackboard
Collaborate (formerly, Elluminate Live Classroom). Although the orientation is archived, you are
highly recommended to attend.
Communication
You may reach the instructor at 956-882-7421 or email to [email protected]. Please
leave a message on the answering machine if the department secretary is not around the time you
call. Also, every time you email the instructor, please add "EDTC6358" in the subject line for
better responsiveness. For instance, when you email the instructor about the proposal, you may
put "EDTC6358--Proposal" in the subject line. For the duration of the course, most meetings will
be held on a voluntary or individual basis, except for the two live class meetings (i.e., midterm
debriefing and final presentation). Participants will communicate with the instructor
approximately every other week by writing a reflective journal and reading the instructor
feedback (see the "Reflections" link on the left navigation bar).
Technical Requirements/Resources
The UTB Distance Education provides free Technical Support to students and faculty members
teaching online. Use the Tech Support tab on the very top of this window screen to submit a
request. Please note that when you click on the tab of Tech Support, you will be leaving the
course window. To return to the course window, you will click on the tab of MyUTB on the top
of the window and re-enter the course as you always do.
Digital Library: You will need to access the Digital Library at various times during your Ed Tech
courses. We encourage you to take advantage of this opportunity to access scholarly journals for
use during your program. In addition, you will be required to review and critique tutorials that
are available at the Digital Library.
SMARTHINKING: This provider of online tutoring allows students connect to live tutors from
any computer that has Internet access. They provide online tutoring 24 hours a day, 7 days a
week. They also have an online writing lab where E-structor® Certified tutors critique and return
essays within 24 hours. Students can submit questions or essays for a next day response, or preschedule online appointments. We encourage students to submit all essays to SMARTHINKING
before turning them in. SMARTHINKING can be accessed through the left navigation bar.
For other resources, please click on the Resources button on the left navigation bar.
COURSE CONCEPTUAL FRAMEWORK & KNOWLEDGE BASE
Course Description Expanded and Purpose of the Course
Upon completion of this practicum course:
1. You will successfully demonstrate the ability to serve as an e-learning practitioner by
developing a comprehensive plan for a real-life instructional project
2. You will demonstrate the ability to manage a quality e-learning project by using
appropriate resources available in the field
3. You will be able to reflect on your progress and personal growth as the basis for future
decision making as an e-learning educator
To accomplish the first objective, you will work on a design plan for an online course agreed by
a chosen field supervisor. At this point of the game, you should have a fairly clear idea of what
strengths (and weaknesses) you have with respect to designing and developing online courses
using various resources/tools available while showcasing the conceptual background and skills
you now possess. This instructional project entails three parts. Details for this project can be
found by following the "Project" link on the left navigation bar.
Another aspect of this course project is self-reflection. You will complete a reflective writing on
a regular basis. In doing so, you will demonstrate your meta-cognitive skills for self-assessing
your progress as you work through your project. You will also demonstrate your ability to assess
both progress and pitfalls, and means to effectively address difficulties as well as capitalize on
unforeseen opportunities (and/or crises) as they arise. Thus, self-reflection and project
management are equally important. Please click the Reflections button in the menu frame for
further details. Level: Graduate. Credit: 3 Hours. Anticipated workload: 10-14 hours per week.
Course Objectives
Upon completion of this practicum course, the learner will be able to:
COURSE
OBJECTIVES
NCATE
STANDARDS
SPA
STANDARDS
1. Successfully
demonstrate the ability
to serve as an elearning practitioner
by developing a
comprehensive plan
for a real-life
instructional project
N/A
N/A
2. Demonstrate the
ability to manage a
quality e-learning
project by using
appropriate resources
available in the field
N/A
N/A
COE
CONCEPTUAL
FRAMEWORK
COE-1: Knowledge
in Practice
COE-6: Technology
COE-1: Knowledge
in Practice
COE-6: Technology
3. Demonstrate the
ability to reflect on
your progress and
personal growth as the
basis for future
decision making as an
e-learning educator
N/A
N/A
COE-2: Reflection
EDTC Professional Responsibilities Addressed
Responsibility 2: Design. The candidate will design instruction (or human performance strategies)
to meet the needs of learners. Design documents and projects must show evidence of analysis of
problem situation, awareness of unique characteristics of intended audience and implications for
instruction, selection and implementation instructional strategies consistent with analysis of the
learning situation and intended learners, selection and justification of appropriate medias, and
evidence of both formative and summative evaluation strategies. Performance indicators:
2.1 Demonstrates ability to perform analysis and documentation of instructional need or
opportunity resulting in student-centered, performance based instructional objectives based upon,
and appropriate for, a specific audience.
2.2 Demonstrates ability to perform comprehensive task analysis of an instructional objective.
2.3 Demonstrates ability to select and integrate into instruction a variety of research-based
instructional strategies.
Responsibility 3: Development, Utilization and Management. The candidate will develop,
utilize and manage a variety of media and instructional technologies to deliver instruction to
students. Performance indicators:
3.1 Demonstrates ability to develop instruction using a minimum of three different
medias.
3.2 Applies research-based rationale for the selection and utilization of technologies for learning.
3.3 Demonstrates ability to manage projects and evaluate progress and improvement.
3.4 Uses the results of evaluation methods to revise and update instructional materials.
Responsibility 4: Evaluation. The candidate uses incisive and relevant assessment and evaluation
techniques (e.g., product or project which uses formative and/or summative evaluations).
Candidate demonstrates the ability to evaluate quality of instructional materials and instructional
systems using appropriate methodologies. Candidate also demonstrates the ability to use formative
and summative assessment methodologies to ascertain the effectiveness of instruction in meeting
instructional goals. Performance indicators:
4.1 Demonstrates ability to use formative evaluation strategies to evaluate the quality of
instruction.
4.2 Demonstrates ability to use summative strategies to evaluate the quality of instruction.
4.3 Demonstrates ability to select a variety of appropriate assessment instruments and use those
instruments to assess effectiveness of instruction in meeting instructional objectives.
4.4 Documents results from formative evaluations and uses those results to revise instructional
materials, and/or instructional development process.
TOPICS, LEARNING PROCESSES, AND DESIRED RESULTS
The following is a presentation of the weekly topics, processes, assignments, related course
objectives, and evaluation methods.
DATE
TOPICS
PROCESSES &
ASSIGNMENTS
Prior to
Week 1
 Course preparation
 Receive a welcome
message from the
instructor
 Situate yourself in the
Blackboard class
 Contact the instructor for
project ideas
 Prepare for live
classroom connection
N/A
Week 1
[First Day of The
Class]
 Course Orientation
 Part I Briefing
 Meet in Blackboard
Collaborate at 7:30 PM
Central
 Read syllabus and
calendar
 Begin your design plan
writing
1. Successfully
 Live session
demonstrate the ability to
discussion
serve as an e-learning
participation
practitioner by developing  Write project
a comprehensive plan for a
design plan
real-life instructional
(Part I)
project
Week 2
 E-Learning Design
Principles
 Part I (in progress)
 Meet in Blackboard
Collaborate at 7:30 PM
Central
1. Successfully
 Live session
demonstrate the ability to
discussion
serve as an e-learning
participation
practitioner by developing
a comprehensive plan for a
real-life instructional
project
Week 3
 Biweekly
Reflection Papers
(see Reflections
link)
 Part I Project (in
progress)
 Meet in Blackboard
Collaborate at 7:30 PM
Central
 Submit Reflection 1 by
midnight
RELATED COURSE
OBJECTIVES
EVALUATION
METHODS
 Self-report
email
2. Demonstrate the ability
to manage a quality elearning project by using
appropriate resources
available in the field
1. Successfully
 Live session
demonstrate the ability to
discussion
serve as an e-learning
participation
practitioner by developing  Write reflection
a comprehensive plan for a
real-life instructional
project
2. Demonstrate the ability
to manage a quality elearning project by using
appropriate resources
available in the field
3. Demonstrate the ability
to reflect on your progress
and personal growth as the
basis for future decision
making as an e-learning
educator
Week 4
 Part II Project
Introduction (see
Project link)
 Blackboard:
Introduction
 Meet in Blackboard
Collaborate at 7:30 PM
Central
 Submit Part I Project by
midnight
 Start Part II Project
Week 5
 Blackboard:
Display View
 Part II Project (in
progress)
 Meet in Blackboard
Collaborate at 7:30 PM
Central
 Submit Reflection 2 by
midnight
 Receive feedback on Part
I
1. Successfully
 Live session
demonstrate the ability to
discussion
serve as an e-learning
participation
practitioner by developing  Develop Ea comprehensive plan for a
Learning course
real-life instructional
and write design
project
principles (Part
II)
1. Successfully
 Live session
demonstrate the ability to
discussion
serve as an e-learning
participation
practitioner by developing  Write reflection
a comprehensive plan for a
real-life instructional
project
2. Demonstrate the ability
to manage a quality elearning project by using
appropriate resources
available in the field
3. Demonstrate the ability
to reflect on your progress
and personal growth as the
basis for future decision
making as an e-learning
educator
Week 6
Week 7
 Blackboard: Edit
View
 Part II Project (in
progress)
 Blackboard:
Control Panel
 Part II Project (in
progress)
 Meet in Blackboard
Collaborate at 7:30 PM
Central
 Continue Part II Project
 Continue working on
Part II Project
 Meet in Blackboard
Collaborate at 7:30 PM
Central
 Submit Reflection 3 by
midnight
 Continue Part II Project
1. Successfully
 Live session
demonstrate the ability to
discussion
serve as an e-learning
participation
practitioner by developing
a comprehensive plan for a
real-life instructional
project
2. Demonstrate the ability
to manage a quality elearning project by using
appropriate resources
available in the field
1. Successfully
 Live session
demonstrate the ability to
discussion
serve as an e-learning
participation
practitioner by developing  Write reflection
a comprehensive plan for a
real-life instructional
project
2. Demonstrate the ability
to manage a quality elearning project by using
appropriate resources
available in the field
3. Demonstrate the ability
to reflect on your progress
Week 8
 Part II Project (in
progress)
 Continue Part II Project
and personal growth as the
basis for future decision
making as an e-learning
educator
1. Successfully
 Send project
demonstrate the ability to
document for
serve as an e-learning
review &
practitioner by developing
feedback
a comprehensive plan for a
(optional)
real-life instructional
project
2. Demonstrate the ability
to manage a quality elearning project by using
appropriate resources
available in the field
Week 9
Week 10
Spring Break
 Midterm
Debriefing (see
Presentations link)
 Part II Project (in
progress)
N/A
 Meet in Blackboard
Collaborate at 7:30 PM
Central
 Submit Reflection 4 by
midnight
 Continue Part II Project
N/A
1. Successfully
demonstrate the ability to
serve as an e-learning
practitioner by developing
a comprehensive plan for a
real-life instructional
project
 N/A
 Present
Midterm
Debriefing
 Live session
discussion
participation
 Write reflection
2. Demonstrate the ability
to manage a quality elearning project by using
appropriate resources
available in the field
3. Demonstrate the ability
to reflect on your progress
and personal growth as the
basis for future decision
making as an e-learning
educator
Week 11
Week 12
 Part II Project (in
progress)
 Part II Project (in
progress)
 Continue Part II Project
 Submit Reflection 5 by
midnight
 Continue Part II Project
1. Successfully
 Send project
demonstrate the ability to
document for
serve as an e-learning
review &
practitioner by developing
feedback
a comprehensive plan for a
(optional)
real-life instructional
project
2. Demonstrate the ability
to manage a quality elearning project by using
appropriate resources
available in the field
1. Successfully
 Write reflection
demonstrate the ability to
 Send project
serve as an e-learning
document for
practitioner by developing
review &
a comprehensive plan for a
feedback
real-life instructional
(optional)
project
2. Demonstrate the ability
to manage a quality elearning project by using
appropriate resources
available in the field
3. Demonstrate the ability
to reflect on your progress
and personal growth as the
basis for future decision
making as an e-learning
educator
Week 13
Week 14
 Part II Project (in
progress)
 Part III Project
Introduction (see
Project link)
 Continue Part II Project
 Meet in Blackboard
Collaborate at 7:30 PM
Central
 Submit Reflection 6 by
midnight
 Submit Part II Project by
midnight
1. Successfully
 Send project
demonstrate the ability to
document for
serve as an e-learning
review &
practitioner by developing
feedback
a comprehensive plan for a
(optional)
real-life instructional
project
2. Demonstrate the ability
to manage a quality elearning project by using
appropriate resources
available in the field
1. Successfully
 Live session
demonstrate the ability to
discussion
serve as an e-learning
participation
practitioner by developing  Write reflection
a comprehensive plan for a  Write Lessons
real-life instructional
Learned
project
document (Party
III)
2. Demonstrate the ability
to manage a quality elearning project by using
appropriate resources
available in the field
3. Demonstrate the ability
to reflect on your progress
and personal growth as the
basis for future decision
making as an e-learning
educator
Week 15
 Part III (in
progress)
 Continue Part III Project
 Receive feedback on Part
II Project
Week 16
[Last Day of The
Class]
 Meet in Blackboard
Collaborate at 7:30 PM
Central
 Submit Part III Project
by midnight
 Submit all *permitted*
course work by midnight
 Final Presentation
Week 17
 Course Evaluation
 Complete course
evaluation
2. Demonstrate the ability
to manage a quality elearning project by using
appropriate resources
available in the field
2. Demonstrate the ability
to manage a quality elearning project by using
appropriate resources
available in the field
 Send project
document for
review &
feedback
(optional)
 Give Final
Presentation
 Live session
discussion
participation
3. Demonstrate the ability
to reflect on your progress
and personal growth as the
basis for future decision
making as an e-learning
educator
N/A
 Student Course
Evaluation
Performance Tasks
The section below summarizes the performance tasks (assignments) in this course and their
grade values.
Your performance in the course is evaluated on various assignments and activities, which include
(a) a course project consisting of a design plan (Part I), the project itself (Part II), and a final,
lessons-learned document (Part III), (b) six biweekly reflection papers, (c) a midterm debriefing,
and (d) a final presentation. Also, the proposal must be approved no later than one week after it
is due. Please consult the course calendar for specific due dates.
Course Project: As mentioned previously, the course project is three-fold. Part one project is a
design plan (12%). Part two project has two components: (a) an e-learning course (25%) and (b)
Design Principles (25%). The designed e-learning course should be developed in accordance
with the design plan that is also agreed upon (signed) by a field supervisor along with the
instructor of this course. And, the Design Principles document must depict all the adopted online
course development guidelines and be in line with major steps of the Dick and Carey model
adopted in the EDTC 6321 Instructional Design class. Part three project is a formal reflective
writing (10%). See the “Project” button for more information or below:
[Overview]
As Syllabus indicates, This practicum/capstone project consists of three parts: a proposal, an
instructional package, and a reflective, "lessons learned" synopsis at the end of the project. The
three parts are worth 72% of your end-of-class grade. Number of parts: Three.
[Objectives]
Upon completion of these assignments, you will demonstrate the ability to (1) demonstrate the
ability to respond to a need of e-learning by evaluating and synthesizing learned knowledge,
skills, and dispositions, (2) manage an online course development project by using all the
resources available, and (3) synthesize learned experience of developing an online course for
future references.
[Part I: Design Plan]
The first part is a proposal (worth 12% of the end-of-class grade) in which you describe your
plan of this online course. A checklist is provided below for your information.
Your design plan should be explicit and it should fully describe the ultimate goal and translated
objectives of the course. The plan should also include a description of what your tentative plan of
action is and what the deliverables look like. A timeline is also required. Most importantly, this
plan must be agreed upon by a field supervisor before it is submitted to the instructor of this
graduate class. This supervisor can be the instructor of the online course you are developing if
you prefer to work with a client, who will evaluate the course for you by actually teaching it to
the target audience later in the semester.
If you prefer to work on one of your own courses and repackage/repurpose it to an online course,
it is fine. But, you will need to look for a person who can supervise you in the field. This person
can be your direct supervisor or s/he can be your school principal.
Whether you work on one of your own courses or with a client, you need to realize that the field
supervisor's job is to assist the instructor in keeping track of your performance in the remote site
and assessing your work objectively. The supervisor's contact information you provide in the
design plan will allow the instructor to get in touch with the supervisor. These two will work
closely and manage to provide you with any immediate, possible assistance when needed. And,
you and the field supervisor will also maintain an effective working relationship in a hope to
complete this course development satisfactorily. During the semester, the instructor will contact
the field supervisor on a regular basis via email or telephone calls. By the end of the semester,
the field supervisor will be surveyed for performance satisfaction.
Please note that it is your responsibility to take time and look for such field supervisor that is
willing to help with this job. Unfortunately, at this point, this supervision is not awarded by any
monetary compensation. Also be advised that this design plan must be approved within two
weeks after it is due in order to complete this course on time and that revisions before approval
are expected.
When the design plan is ready, please submit it by the deadline through Assignments link on the
left navigation or the redirected link below for review.
This part is worth 12% of the final grade. Requested file format: DOCX
[Part II: E-Learning Course and Design Principles]
The bulk of the project is in the second part of your project. After your design plan is approved
by the instructor, you will develop the planned online course in Blackboard (25% of the end-ofclass grade). This course design should stick to the approved design plan, which is drawn from
the Dick and Carey model (2004). See the grading rubric below for more information.
A Blackboard account will be created for you, the client (if applicable), and the field supervisor
as well as the instructor of this course in the beginning of the semester. Several Blackboard
training/demonstration sessions are scheduled in the first half of the semester. Please note that
you will use the Blackboard system to develop the online course as the e-learning developer. For
many of you, this experience is not easy to come by partially because of its availability, so please
take advantage of this exciting opportunity.
So, you will use Blackboard to house your course content. This is one aspect of Part II Project.
The other aspect is for you to prepare a documentation file that depicts every single e-learning
design principle (with explanation) applied to your work (25% of the end-of-class grade). In live
classroom sessions, you will have an opportunity to search the literature for appropriate online
course evaluation rubrics prior to comparing and contrasting these resources and later compiling
a list of universally acceptable design principles. The compiled list will enable you to check for
anything that goes right (or wrong) about the developed online course.
Please submit your design principles file through Assignments link or the redirected link below
by the due date for review. By submitting this file, you are also submitting your e-learning
course. So, no additional action is needed to submit the developed Blackboard course.
This part is worth 50% of the final grade. Requested course shell: UTB Blackboard; requested
file format: DOCX
[Part I: Lessons Learned]
The last part of your project (worth 10%) is an extensive conclusion entitled, "lessons learned."
This 1000-word *formal* writing is a synopsis of the e-learning course development project and
your reflective writings. Avoid colloquialism and slang. See the rubric below for more details.
When the Word document is ready, please submit it by the deadline through Assignments link on
the left navigation or the redirected link below for review.
This part is worth 10% of the final grade. Requested file format: DOCX
[Design Plan Template]
See below for the adopted template.
BEGINNING OF TEMPLATE
EDTC 6358 Theory and Practice of E-Learning
Design Plan Template
Instructions: Please use the following headers and lead questions to organize/prepare your
design plan in paragraphs. Add your name in the beginning of the plan. When a quick
feedback is needed, email the instructor. When draft is ready, please submit to Blackboard for
grades. Format: Font size 12, single-spaced, clear layout (headers), and in DOC or DOCX.
Your name:
Goal/objectives: what is your overarching goal of this online course? Be feasible and clear
(not fuzzy). What specific instructional objectives is the goal translated into? Use either
ABCD model or Dick and Carey model (CN, CR, and B). Choose observable verbs and avoid
busy objectives. Recognize the hierarchy of knowledge and sequence of the objectives.
Specify your target audience.
Plan of action: how do you make the whole thing happen? What resources do you have?
What instructional strategies do you plan to take? Perhaps most importantly, what learning
space do you have in mind, democratic, cybernetic, or prescriptive? What is the foreseeable
weakness or difficulty along with a possible course of action?
Deliverables: what does end product look like? Try to describe it as much as you can. Here
you are asked to paint a picture of what your online course will look like.
Timeline: devise a timeline that depicts milestones of your Blackboard course
development. You probably need to determine major milestones of your project first and
then put them on a timeline in order to see if it is feasible with the timeframe of this class.
Contact information of field supervisor: provide a short account of the individual’s
profile, including any experience pertaining to your course development project. Why is the
individual chosen? What can s/he assist you in the project? What is email, mailing address,
and phone number of the chosen field supervisor?
END OF TEMPLATE
[Rubric]
See Appendix A and B for adopted rubric.
Reflection Papers: There are six biweekly reflection papers (12%). Each is composed of three
sections. You will document your progress in the project/course development and reflect on your
work in these reflection papers on the biweekly basis. Each reflection should be intended to
answer three questions in about 400 words. The questions are: (a) What have you accomplished
in the last two weeks? (b) What are you planning to accomplish in next two weeks? and (c) What
have you learned in the last two weeks? Or, what advice would you give to others interested in a
similar course development to yours? See Reflections for more information or below:
[Overview]
As Syllabus indicates, six biweekly reflection papers are planned. This writing assignment is
worth 12% of your end-of-class grade. Number of parts: Six.
[Objectives]
Upon completion of these assignments, you will demonstrate the ability to reflect on your course
of action and to plan ahead. Another aspect of this writing is to keep the instructor apprised of
your progress. In a sense, these synopses help alert the instructor to any potential problems that
may be developing. Having said that, if needed, please don't hesitate to call the instructor.
[Instructions]
As soon as your proposal is approved, you will proceed with the design plan and submit a short
synopsis (in about 400 words) on a biweekly basis (with a total of six papers for this
assignment). You must consider the following three questions in your writing:
1. What have you accomplished since your last report? (For the first report, you may
describe your activities for the previous weeks.)
2. What are your short-term (work) objectives and plans for achieving those objectives for
the next two weeks?
3. What have you learned since you submitted your previous synopsis?
To receive full credit, you also need to submit the assigned writing on time through Assignments
link on the left navigation or the redirected link at the bottom of this page. This part is worth
12% of the final grade.
Presentations:
[Overview]
As Syllabus indicates, two presentations are planned. They are midterm debriefing, and final
presentation. The two are worth 16% of your end-of-class grade. Number of parts: Two.
[Objectives]
Upon completion of these assigned presentations, you will demonstrate the ability to (1) identify
important concepts of e-learning design and development, (2) reflect on your learning experience
of designing, developing, and evaluating an online course, and (3) contribute to the community
of practice.
[Part 1: Midterm Debriefing] This Blackboard Collaborate (formerly, Elluminate) presentation
(8%) deals with self-reflection and metacognition of student designers (you) who will share their
thoughts on the development of the end product aforementioned and discuss the design rational
by giving an oral presentation within a limited time frame. Session will be archived. See
“Presentations” for more information or below:
Midterm debriefing allows you to meditate on what you have experienced in the
learning/planning/developing process. This metacognitive approach assists you in reflecting on
what you have been through and evaluating this experience with a support group (the class).
What come out of this evaluation process are learned lessons and synthesized thoughts that you
can apply to a novel setting and that, supposedly, will improve your work performance. With all
this in mind, you are preparing a 10-minute Blackboard Collaborate (formerly, Elluminate)
presentation with appropriate visual aids (followed by a 5-minute Q&A session) using the five
questions below:
1. What is the ultimate goal of the project (within the timeframe of this course)? Tell the
class what you plan to accomplish by the submission due date?
2. What does the instructional solution look like now? Is it taking shape? What does your
end product look like at this point?
3. What lessons have you learned? Or, what advice would you give others interested in a
similar course development to yours?
4. What is the chance of finishing the online course by the deadline?
5. Is there any other concern or issue that may interest the class as a whole?
This part is worth 8% of the final grade.
[Part 2: Final Presentation] Another Collaborate session (8%) here centers around the
produced learning object. You will showcase your end product in Collaborate and synthesize any
learned lessons. Session will be archived. See Presentations for more information.
Final presentation is scheduled close to the end of the semester after your Part II Project is
completed. The rationale for this is for you to showcase the best of your work. The submitted
product by far should have gone through the evaluation process. Whether the evaluators'
suggestions/comments are addressed in the current version, their thoughts must be at least taken
into consideration. Use the following five questions to put together your 10-minute final
presentation in Blackboard Collaborate (formerly, Elluminate) with appropriate visual aids
(followed by a 5-minute Q&A session).
1. What is the terminal or ultimate goal of the planned online course (within the timeframe
of this course)? Tell the class what you planned to accomplish.
2. What have you accomplished in your course? Describe it.
3. How does the end product differ from your initial design plan?
4. Tell the class about your rationale for the online course design by using one of your
lessons/modules/units as an example.
5. What lesson(s) have you learned from this course project?
This part is worth 8% of the final grade.
Assignment Weights Overview
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
Part One Project: 12%
Midterm Debriefing: 8%
Part Two Project--Design Principles: 25%, E-Learning Course in Blackboard: 25%
Part Three Project: 10%
Final Presentation: 8%
Reflection Papers: 12%
Other Course Policies
All graded assignments are due on, or prior to, the due date as stated in the Course Schedule.
There will be a "one-lower-grade" penalty (approximately 10% deduction) for all late work. Late
work is accepted only within one week of the due date, with exception of weekends and holidays
(see UTB Calendar at http://www.utb.edu/vpaa/Pages/current_calendars.aspx). Any work
submitted more than one week late or after the last class day (whichever comes first) will not be
accepted.
Please apply UTB's Handbook of Operating Procedures (HOP) to all the other cases not stated
here. HOOP policies are located at http://www.utb.edu/ba/hoop/Pages/default.aspx.
If you do not agree with a grade on an assignment, quiz, or others, it is your responsibility to
appeal the grade to the professor within one week after the assignment is returned or the grade is
posted in Blackboard.
Unauthorized duplication of copyrighted material are subject to appropriate disciplinary actions
as well as those civil remedies and criminal penalties provided by federal law.
MAJOR REQUIREMENTS, DEMONSTRATION OF MASTERY & EVALUATION
Rationale for Selecting Requirements
1.
2.
3.
4.
Candidate performance on course project assignments
Scheduled live sessions’ participation
Biweekly reflective writing
Presentations
Evaluation Weights and Summary
Students will be provided with a final letter grade based on above criteria. The instructor reserves
the right to penalize any additional facets of unprofessional and irresponsible work dispositions
or conduct, if the need arises.
Grading System
Partial evaluations will be made with numbers (exams, tests, papers, presentations and so on).
Letter grades of “A” through “F” (course final grade) will be awarded based on the following
scale:
Incomplete Grades: A grade of Incomplete (I) may be given at the discretion of the instructor to
a student who has been unable to complete the course requirements due to a serious interruption
not caused by the student’s own negligence.
UTB GRADING SYSTEM POLICIES & PROCEDURES
A student's performance in academic work is expressed by the following grades:
Alphanumeric Grading System
+/- LETTER GRADE
GRADE POINTS
A+
A
AB+
B
BC+
C
CD+
D
F
4 grade points
4 grade points
3.67 grade points
3.33 grade points
3 grade points
2.67 grade points
2.33 grade points
2 grade points
1.67 grade points
1.33 grade points
1 grade point
0 grade points
100-POINT SCALE GUIDE
(Not prescriptive)
98 - 100
93 - 97.9
90 - 92.9
87 - 89.9
83 - 86.9
80 - 82.9
77 - 79.9
73 - 76.9
70 - 72.9
67 - 69.9
63 - 66.9
Below 60
To receive credit for a course, an undergraduate must earn a grade of at least D. Academic
departments may require a higher grade for the course to be counted toward the student's
degree.
To include a course in the Program of Work for a graduate degree, a graduate student must
earn a grade of at least C. More information about the Program of Work is given in the
graduate catalog.
One of the following symbols may be assigned instead of a grade. Courses in which these
symbols are recorded are not included in the grade point average.
Valid Symbols Used in Grading
Au
NC
Q
W
X
I
* asterisk
S
U
# pound sign
Z
Audit
No credit
Course was dropped
Withdrawn
Temporary delay of course grade
Permanent incomplete
Course is continuing
Satisfactory
Unsatisfactory
Grade was not submitted in time for this report
Student is registered on the credit/no credit or pass/fail basis
To receive the symbol CR, an undergraduate must earn a grade of at least D. To receive the
symbol CR, a graduate student must earn a grade of at least C.
Incomplete Grade Request
A student, who is unable to complete the course requirements due to a sudden, serious
interruption not caused by the student’s own negligence, may request consideration for an
Incomplete (I) grade. In order to qualify for consideration for an Incomplete Grade request, the
student must have been successfully completing the course and all requirements/assignments, up
to the point when the unexpected event that prevents the student from completing the course,
occurs. According to the UTB Registrar’s Office (2011): “Incomplete grades are not issued
for student or faculty convenience. They may be issued only in the case of compelling,
non-academic circumstances beyond the student's control” (Incomplete Grades, para. 3).
Please
review
the
complete
UTB
Incomplete
http://www.utb.edu/em/registrar/Pages/registrargrades.aspx
Grade
Policy
at:
Grade Point Average (GPA) Calculation
Grade points are computed by multiplying the points for each grade by the number of credit
hours; for example, 4 (A) x 3 (hours) = 12 grade points. A student’s grade point average (GPA)
is determined by dividing the total number of grade points earned by the number of semester
hours for which a grade other than X, NC, or CR is received.
INSTITUTIONAL POLICIES
Faculty and students are responsible for understanding and adhering to all UTB Institutional
Policies. University policies are subject to change so it is important to read them at the beginning
of each semester as the policies may have changed since your last class. Please click on the
following link to review the updated UTB Institutional Policies:
http://www.utb.edu/vpaa/Documents/University_Policies.pdf
APPENDIX A
Rubric for Part II E-Learning Course Development
APPENDIX B
Rubric for Part III Lessons Learned
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