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Document 2305149
History of Kids Voting USA
Kids Voting USA – Brownsville Facts
History of Kids Voting USABrownsville
Letters of Support
City of Brownsville Proclamation
Kids Voting USA National Office
History
On a fishing trip to Costa Rica in 1988, three Arizona businessmen discovered that the voter turnout in that
country was about 90 percent and was attributed to a tradition of parents taking their children with them when
they went to the polls to vote. The men were intrigued by the idea. “If they can do it here, we can do it at
home,” they thought. But they also recognized a missing link to education, so they launched a school-based
pilot project in a Phoenix suburb that has grown into KVUSA.
The academic program of KVUSA is unique in that it combines civic learning in the
classroom with a voting
experience in state and national elections that is instructive and formative for the students because it models
precisely the adult voting process. There are only 27 KVUSA affiliates across the country!
Kids Voting USA
5423 SW 7th Street
Topeka, KS 66606
Phone: (785) 271-6350
Executive Director
Rachel Willis
What is Kids Voting USA – Brownsville?
Kids Voting USA-Brownsville (KVUSA-B) is an officially
recognized partnership between the University of Texas at
Brownsville’s (UTB) Center for Civic Engagement (CCE)
and all of the schools of Brownsville: public, private and
home schools. The collaboration is the only one of its kind in
the United States. KVUSA-B engages students and families
in voting and other civic activities.
Our Purpose
Brownsville is experiencing the diminution of civic engagement, which in turn has a negative impact on the
community and solidarity. Kids Voting USA-Brownsville intends to turn this around by teaching youngsters,
beginning at kindergarten and continuing on through High School, the basics of responsible citizenship in a free
society: know the issues: know the candidates, vote, and hold the elected accountable. Kids Voting USABrownsville is unique because it combines classroom learning with an authentic voting experience in all
elections, local, state and national.
Our Mission
Kids Voting USA-Brownsville fosters an informed, participating electorate by educating and actively engaging
students and their families in voting and other elements of effective civic engagement. Kids Voting USA is
working to secure the future of democracy by preparing young people to be educated, engaged voters. Our
participants will know the issues, know the candidates, vote, and hold the elected accountable.
Kids Voting USA-Brownsville History
In the year 2000 national election cycle, Dr, Sandy McGehee, Education Editor at the Brownsville Herald,
brought the national program, Kids Voting USA (KVUSA) to a number of BISD schools. The great success of
Dr. McGehee enterprise prompted Armand Mathew, OMI, then director of the UTB TSC Center for Civic
Engagement (CCE) to begin the effort to bring KVUSA to all the schools of Brownsville on a permanent basis.
In 2003, he submitted CCE’s application to become an official affiliate of KVUSA. The application carried
twelve letters of support that included UTB President Dr. Juliet Garcia, BISD Superintendent, city leaders and
many community leaders. The national office acknowledged that it had never before received an application
with such widespread and substantial community support. The application was accepted and CCE thus became
an official affiliate of KVUSA.
The CCE moved immediately to form a partnership with the Brownsville Independent School District (BISD).
Principally through the wise counsel and generous assistance of Ms. Mary Jo Monfils, at that time the BISD
Assistant Superintendent for Curriculum and Instruction, the necessary intermediate steps were quickly
completed, including getting the KVUSA academic program aligned with the TEKS and TAKS objectives. Ms.
Monfils then crafted a Memorandum of Understanding between CCE and BISD. The memorandum was
approved unanimously by the BISD Board of Trustees and signed by officials of UTB, BISD, and CCE.
The private schools, including home schooling, soon joined the partnership. Thus, KVUSA-B was born. CCE
is the only affiliate of KVUSA that has a formal and official operating agreement with all the schools of its
community.
Letters of Support
In 2003, various community members representative of many organizations endorsed the UTB
and TSC Center for Civic Engagement’s efforts to bring Kids Voting USA to Brownsville on a
permanent basis, in partnership with BISD, BANSA, and HOPE.
Dr. Juliet V. Garcia, President, UTB/TSC
Mayor Eddie Trevino, Jr., City of Brownsville, Texas
Cameron County Judge Gilberto Hinojosa
Rogelio Ortiz, Administrator, Cameron County Department of Elections and Voter
Registration
Daniel Cavazos, Publisher, The Brownsville Herald
Frank Field, President & CEO, Brownsville Chamber of Commerce
Raul A. Besteiro, Jr., Director and CEO, Port of Brownsville
Jason Hilts, President and CEO, Brownsville Economic Development Council
Sr. Marcella Ewers, DC, Superintendent of Schools, Catholic Diocese of Brownsville
Dr. Michal E. Zolkoski, Superintendent of Schools, Brownsville Independent School District
Dr. Roberto Robles, Medical Director, Heart Institute of Brownsville
Ms. Mary Rose Cardenas, Cardenas Development Company, Inc.
Kids Voting USA-Brownsville officially became an affiliate of the National Kids Voting
USA network in October 2003.
In November 2005, the Brownsville City Commission proclaimed the Thursday before the first
Monday in November Kids Voting USA/Brownsville Day.
Kids Voting Curriculum
Sample Activities
Grades K – 2
“Voter Registration”
“Voting Simulation”
“I Go to the Polls”
Grades 3-5
“Know the Vote”
“Polling Place Mural”
“Suffrage Timeline”
K– 2 ELECTIONS AND VOTING I Register and Vote
KIDS VOTING REGISTRATION
(20-30 minutes)
OBJECTIVE
Students understand the importance of
registering to vote.
MATERIALS
Voter Registration Cards handout; Registration
Badges handout; lined paper
GET READY
Copy enough Voter Registration Cards for your
students.
Prepare three Registration Badges – cut them
out from the handout. If possible, print them
out on colored paper.
Put two or three tables or desks together at the
front of the room.
For more information, see “Elections” in
the Appendix.
INSTRUCTIONS
Say to your students, Have you ever signed up
for swimming lessons or school? If so, you
probably had to go in before the first day of
class and sign up. Another word for signing up
is “registering.” Before you can vote you must
register to put your name on the list of voters.
Assign three students to be the registrars for the
class. Give each registrar a Registration Badge.
Give each registrar a stack of Registration
Cards and a registration sheet. (The registration sheet could be a piece of lined paper
folded down the middle.) Have the registrars
sit at the desks/chairs you put together.
Instruct the students to come to the
tables/desks three at a time to fill out their
Registration Cards and sign the registration
sheets. (Have the students sign their names on
the left side of the registration sheet.)
Each student goes to one registrar who helps
them through the registration process, so it is
important that the registrars know how the
process works.
Have the registrars switch roles with students
who have already registered so that they have a
chance to register.
Tell your students that you will send the
Registration Cards home with them the day
before the Kids Voting election so they can
take them to the polls.
Save the registration sheet for the Voting
Simulation activity.
DISCUSSION QUESTIONS
# Why do we register?
# What could happen if people voted without
registering?
MORE!
As an alternative to classroom registration,
help coordinate a school registration day for
both students and parents. Invite a deputy
registrar for parents and let students register
for the Kids Voting election at the same time.
Grades K-2 ELECTIONS AND VOTING
©2005 Kids Voting USA, Inc. – All rights reserved.
1
©2005 Kids Voting USA, Inc. – All rights reserved.
Student
Teacher
School
Teacher
School
School
School
Student
Teacher
Teacher
Voter Registration
Student
Student
Voter Registration
Voter Registration
Voter Registration
KIDS VOTING REGISTRATION
VOTER REGISTRATION CARDS
Grades K-2 ELECTIONS AND VOTING
2
KIDS VOTING REGISTRATION
REGISTRATION BADGES
Grades K-2 ELECTIONS AND VOTING
©2005 Kids Voting USA, Inc. – All rights reserved.
3
K‐2
Elections
&
Voting
I
Register
&
Vote
VOTING SIMULATION
(30 minutes)
OBJECTIVE
Students vote in a simulated polling place to
become familiar with the voting process.
MATERIALS
Polling Place Diagram handout; Ballots handout;
material for a ballot box and voting booth
GET READY
✔ Choose an issue that will impact the students
rather quickly. For instance, vote on what to
play at recess or how to determine seating or
something fun like, What tastes best:
a chocolate chip or peanut butter cookie?
✔ Prepare ballots from the Ballots handout or
determine a way to vote on blank pieces of paper.
✔ Prepare a simple ballot box and voting booth.
✔ Arrange a corner of the classroom to resemble
a polling place as shown in the diagram.
✔ Let each student go through the voting process.
✔ Instruct the marshal to tally and announce
the vote.
✔ Implement the vote.
DISCUSSION QUESTIONS
★ Who can go into a polling place?
★ Have you ever gone with your parents? If yes,
what was it like?
★ How do adults know where to go to vote?
★ If they don’t know, how can they find out?
★ Can everybody vote?
★ Have you voted at the Kids Voting booth
before? What was it like?
★ Where will you go to cast your Kids Voting
vote this election?
★ Are there any rules in a polling place?
★ What do you think are good manners for a
polling place?
INSTRUCTIONS
✔ Explain the duties of the precinct workers
(see handout) and assign students to role play
the part of the workers. Seat them as shown
in the diagram.
✔ Give one of the judges the registration sheet
derived from the Kids Voting Registration
activity.
✔ Give the clerks lined paper to record the voters
as they come in.
✔ Hand the ballots to the other judge.
✔ Seat the marshal by the ballot box.
✔ Ask a student to demonstrate by casting the
first vote.
©2005 Kids Voting USA, Inc. – All rights
reserved.
K‐2
Elections
&
Voting
1
VOTING SIMULATION
POLLING PLACE DIAGRAM
At the polls there are usually: one inspector; two judges — one
Republican, one Democrat; two clerks — one Republican, one
Democrat; and one marshal.
As you enter you will generally meet:
1
A judge with the register, a list containing the names of
registered voters in the precinct, who will ask your name,
find it in the register, and ask you to sign beside it
2
Two clerks, one for each party, who will add your name to a
list to witness that you have voted
3
Another judge, who will hand you your ballot, and help you
understand how to cast your ballot
4
A voting booth
5
The marshal, who will take your ballot and place it in the
ballot box
6
The inspector, who oversees the polling place and assigns all
the workers their duties
©2005 Kids Voting USA, Inc. – All rights
reserved.
Poll workers have other duties. For
instance the marshal makes sure that the
law is kept. She watches that no one
campaigns within 150 feet of the polls
and she checks to see that everyone in
line when the poll closes gets a chance
to vote.
You, the voter, will:
1. Sign in by writing your name in
the register
2. Take a ballot from a judge
3. Go to the booth and vote
4. Return your ballot to the marshal
K‐2
Elections
&
Voting
2
©2005 Kids Voting USA, Inc. – All rights
reserved.
VOTE FOR ONE
VOTE FOR ONE
VOTE FOR ONE
VOTE FOR ONE
BALLOT
BALLOT
BALLOT
VOTE FOR ONE
VOTE FOR ONE
BALLOT
BALLOT
BALLOT
VOTING SIMULATION
BALLOTS
K‐2
Elections
&
Voting
3
K‐2
Elections
&
Voting
CULMINATING ACTIVITY: I GO TO THE POLLS
(Time varies)
OBJECTIVE
Students engage in an authentic voting
experience.
MATERIALS
Election materials supplied by your Kids
Voting USA affiliate
GET READY
✔ Have your students’ voter registration cards
handy. (They should have filled them out
during the Kids Voting Registration activity.
If your students did not participate in this
activity, consider doing it with them prior to
their casting their votes.)
INSTRUCTIONS
✔ Tell your students, Now that we know what
voting is and why it is important, let’s use our
right to vote and make a difference!
✔ Give your students back their registration
cards prior to their voting experience so they
can take them to the polls.
✔ Have your students participate in your local
Kids Voting USA affiliate election. If you are
not sure who your contact person is (whether
a grade-level chair, school principal, etc.) visit
our Web site: www.kidsvotingusa.org and click
on “Affiliate Network.” It will give you the
contact information for your local Kids Voting
USA affiliate. They should be able to give you
the information you need.
©2005 Kids Voting USA, Inc. – All rights
reserved.
✔ Have your students reflect, either verbally or in
written form, both on their voting experience
and on how they plan to continue to make a
difference in their community.
DISCUSSION QUESTIONS
★ How did it make you feel when you voted?
★ Does voting give you power? How?
★ How do you think it would feel if you were not
allowed to vote?
★ Do all people vote who are able to?
Why do some people not vote? How do you
feel about that?
★ Why is it important to study the candidates
and issues?
★ What are good ways to learn about the
candidates and issues?
★ What does it mean to register? Why is
registering important?
★ Is voting the only way you can make a
difference? What else can you do to make
a difference?
K‐2
Elections
&
Voting
1
3‐5
Elections
&
Voting
Suffrage
Then
&
Now
KNOW THE VOTE
(Time varies)
OBJECTIVE
Students experience voter apathy and ignorance.
MATERIALS
Materials for signs; materials for a ballot box;
Ballots handout; clipboard; lined paper
GET READY
✔ Set up your classroom for a vote, but do not
announce it to the class. Create a sign that
says you are voting that day on (something
that the students will care about). The sign
should also say, “Place your ballot in the ballot
box by the end of the day.” The sign should list
several options to choose from to answer the
ballot question. Place the sign somewhere
visible in the room.
✔ Make copies of the Ballots handout and cut
enough ballots for each student in your class
to cast one vote.
✔ Place a ballot box and the ballots somewhere in
the room that is visible but not too prominent.
✔ Next to the ballot box leave a clipboard with
lined paper. Label the paper “Voter Registration.”
✔ For more information, see “Voter Apathy” in
the Appendix.
INSTRUCTIONS
✔ Come up with something for your class to vote
on, but do not make any announcements to the
class regarding the vote. Set up the classroom
as described above and see if the students can
figure out the voting process. Note: if students
ask questions of you individually (such as where
the ballot box is), answer them, but do not
share any information with the class as a whole.
©2005 Kids Voting USA, Inc. – All rights
reserved.
✔ At the end of the day, point out the sign that
announced the vote you held that day. Then
point out the ballot box and ballots as well as
the registration clipboard. Ask the class, Who
noticed these things in the classroom? What
did you do? Did you vote? Did you tell other
people to vote?
✔ Check the voter registration sheet and the
ballot box. Count the ballots and announce the
outcome of the vote. Make it clear that you had
to register on the sheet before you could vote
and therefore only those people who registered
had their votes count.
✔ There will be a mix of reactions in the classroom from those that were not aware of the
vote, those that knew of a vote but did not
know how to cast their vote, those that voted
but did not register, and those that registered
and voted. In the possibility that no one correctly registered and voted, you should make
sure you registered and voted. Point out that
because you both registered and voted you got
to make the decision for the class without
their input.
✔ Carry out the decision of the vote.
✔ Tell the class that there will be a similar voting
opportunity the next day. At the end of the day,
change the sign to reflect a new question. See
how many more people register and vote the
next day and make a note of it to the class.
3‐5
Elections
&
Voting
1
3‐5
Elections
&
Voting
Suffrage
Then
&
Now
KNOW THE VOTE
(continued)
DISCUSSION QUESTIONS
★ How did you feel after the first day of voting?
★ How was this experience for you on the second
day of voting?
★ If you did not vote the first day, why didn’t
you? (Didn’t care…weren’t sure what to do…)
★ If you voted the second day but not the first,
what changed?
★ Why do you think 18-24-year-olds do not vote
as much as other age groups in our country?
★ In general, why do you think so many people
do not vote in our country? Is there anything
we can do to change this?
★ How did you feel when you got to vote in
this activity?
©2005 Kids Voting USA, Inc. – All rights
reserved.
★ Did you know that there have been groups of
people in our country who have not had the
right to vote?
★ How do you think they felt? Why do you think
they were left out of the process?
★ Can everyone in our country vote?
Can everyone in the world vote?
3‐5
Elections
&
Voting
2
KNOW THE
VOTE
BALLOTS
Ballot
Ballot
Name:
Name:
Choice:
Choice:
Ballot
Ballot
Name:
Name:
Choice:
Choice:
Ballot
Ballot
Name:
Name:
Choice:
Choice:
Ballot
Ballot
Name:
Name:
Choice:
Choice:
Ballot
Ballot
Name:
Name:
Choice:
Choice:
©2005 Kids Voting USA, Inc. – All rights
reserved.
3‐5
Elections
&
Voting
3
3‐5
Elections
&
Voting
I
Register
&
Vote
POLLING PLACE MURAL
(30 minutes)
OBJECTIVE
Students choose appropriate sites for
polling places.
MATERIALS
Mural Symbols handout; glue; scissors;
markers or crayons; several sheets of butcher
paper or newsprint
GET READY
✔ Make several copies of the Mural Symbols
handout.
✔ Have the glue, scissors, markers or crayons,
and several large sheets of butcher paper or
newsprint ready for use.
✔ See “Election Precincts” in the Appendix.
INSTRUCTIONS
✔ Divide your students into groups of three or four.
✔ Instruct each group to design a mural depicting
a neighborhood similar to their own. (They
may choose the neighborhood surrounding the
school if they are from different areas.) Have
your students draw their design and/or use
symbols from the handout.
✔ After allowing them time to finish their
murals, discuss with them the questions below.
✔ Ask each group to indicate the best location for
a polling place on their murals.
✔ Let each group show their mural to the class
and explain how their polling place is on a
reasonable site.
DISCUSSION QUESTIONS
★ What sorts of buildings act as polling places?
(churches, schools, etc.)
★ Why are polling places located in such buildings?
★ Is our school a polling place?
★ What time do the polling places open and close?
★ Have you ever been to a polling place with an
adult? If so, what was it like?
★ Do you know where the adults at your house go
to vote? Where? If not, where can you find out?
MORE!
If there are several polling places within the
boundaries of your school, assign your
students to find the polling place where they
will vote. Post a map of the area in your room
and let the students place nametags at their
polling places.
©2005 Kids Voting USA, Inc. – All rights
reserved.
3‐5
Elections
&
Voting
1
POLLING PLACE
MURAL
MURAL SYMBOLS
©2005 Kids Voting USA, Inc. – All rights
reserved.
3‐5
Elections
&
Voting
2
3‐5
Elections
&
Voting
Suffrage
Then
&
Now
SUFFRAGE TIMELINE
(30 minutes)
OBJECTIVE
Students learn that the population with voting
rights has drastically changed over the years.
MATERIALS
U.S. Suffrage Timeline handout; Suffrage
Timeline Questions handout
GET READY
✔ Break your students up into small groups of
two or three (or if your students are younger,
work together as a class on the activity).
✔ Make photocopies of the U.S. Suffrage
Timeline handout and the Suffrage Timeline
Questions handout for each group of students.
INSTRUCTIONS
✔ Provide a definition of suffrage and explain
who has the right to vote today.
✔ Inform your students that they are going to
investigate the history of the right to vote
in America.
✔ Give each group copies of the U.S. Suffrage
Timeline handout and the Suffrage Timeline
Questions handout.
✔ Go over the U.S. Suffrage Timeline handout
with the entire class.
©2005 Kids Voting USA, Inc. – All rights
reserved.
✔ Have the groups use the U.S. Suffrage
Timeline handout to answer the questions on
the Suffrage Timeline Questions handout.
✔ Once each group has completed the Suffrage
Timeline Questions handout, have a class
discussion comparing and contrasting answers
to the questions.
DISCUSSION QUESTIONS
★ Which questions were the most difficult to
answer? Why?
★ Were there questions that had no “right”
answer? Which questions and why?
★ Were there any dates on the timeline that
surprised you? How so?
★ Why is learning about suffrage so important
for young citizens of the United States?
3‐5
Elections
&
Voting
1
SUFFRAGE TIMELINE
U.S. SUFFRAGE TIMELINE
1776 The Declaration of Independence is signed. The right to vote is based on property ownership.
Suffrage is primarily for white male Protestants over the age of 21.
1787 The Constitution is drafted. States are given the power to regulate their own suffrage laws
and favor white male landowners.
1848 Because African-Americans and women will suffer discrimination at the polls, Elizabeth Cady
Stanton sets forth resolutions for women’s suffrage at the first convention of women’s rights
advocates.
1865 A Civil Rights Act defines citizenship and prohibits discrimination based on race. The
Republican Congress overrides the veto of President Andrew Jackson, hoping to lure the
vote of former slaves.
1868 With the Civil War over, lawmakers enact the 14th Amendment, granting citizenship to
African-Americans and permitting them to vote. But state officials still attempt to deny them
the right to vote.
1870 The 15th Amendment is ratified, providing the legal rights of African-Americans to vote and
prohibiting state and local governments from denying that right.
1890 Wyoming becomes a state and is the first state to provide suffrage for women in its Constitution.
1920 The 19th Amendment is ratified, giving women the right to vote.
1947 Miguel Trujillo, a Native American and former Marine, wins a suit against New Mexico for
not allowing him to vote. New Mexico and Arizona are required to give the vote to all
Native Americans.
1957 The Civil Rights Act passes, allowing punishment for interference with, or disruption of,
protection for African-American voters.
1964 The 24th Amendment passes, outlawing the poll tax.
1965 The Voting Rights Act passes after Martin Luther King, Jr. leads 25,000 people on a march
from Selma to Montgomery, Alabama, to dramatize the need for more voting rights.
1970 The Voting Rights Act is amended to lower the voting age to 18 and ban the use of literacy tests.
1971 The 26th Amendment lowers the voting age from 21 to 18.
©2005 Kids Voting USA, Inc. – All rights
reserved.
3‐5
Elections
&
Voting
2
SUFFRAGE TIMELINE
SUFFRAGE TIMELINE QUESTIONS
Name:
Use the U.S. SUFFRAGE TIMELINE handout to answer the following questions. If you can’t give a
definite answer to a question, state what additional information you would need to know.
1.
You are a Native American living in Arizona in the 1920s. Can you vote?
2.
You are a woman living in Wyoming in 1894. When were you first granted the right to vote?
3.
What was the last U.S. population to earn the right to vote?
4.
What U.S. Constitutional Amendment gave women the right to vote?
5.
You are an African-American male living in Alabama in 1864. Can you vote?
6.
You are an African-American male living in Alabama in the 1940s. Can you vote?
What might be keeping you from voting?
7.
You are a white male in the 1790s and you do not own property. Can you vote?
8.
What did the 24th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution accomplish?
©2005 Kids Voting USA, Inc. – All rights
reserved.
3‐5
Elections
&
Voting
3
2012 - 2013 Activities
Student Generated Voter’s Guide
Celebrate Freedom Week
Brownsville Herald Minipage
Mock Voter Registration
Electronic Voting
Kids Voting USA-Brownsville Day
Spring 2013 Projects
2012 - 2013 Activities: Voter Guide
Kids Voting USA-Brownsville fosters an informed, participating electorate by educating and actively engaging students and
their families in voting and other elements of effective civic engagement.
Student Generated Voter Guide
In an effort to gain the active participation or our students, we are requesting that students consider issues that are important to them
and submit questions that they believe candidates that are running for office should address.
This year, students will be voting for candidates in the national, state, and local elections. Students should consider what questions
they’d ask the candidates running for State Representative, District Attorney, and Sherriff races. Campus teachers are encouraged to
participate in assisting Kids Voting USA-Brownsville in soliciting questions from students about issues that are important to them.
9/2 – 9/7:
Teachers Collect Questions from Students
9/10:
Deadline to Submit Student Generated Questions
10/15 - 10/19:
Voter Guide Available Electronically at www.utb.edu/cce
Sample Voter Guide
1301 E. Madison St. • Brownsville, Texas 78520 • Phone (956) 882-4308 • Fax (956) 882-4309
Email • [email protected]
2012 - 2013 Activities: Celebrate Freedom Week
September 17 – 21, 2012
Many activities have been made available to teachers so that they can actively celebrate “Freedom Week.” We
encourage teachers to decorate their classrooms and/or bulletin boards as students gear up for the upcoming voting
simulations and election activities. Documenting how you celebrated “Freedom Week,” will allow KVUSA-B to
submit projects to the Brownsville Herald for KVUSA-B’s own minipage in the Education section of the paper!
9/20:
Submit Activities and Photos for Brownsville Herald “Minipage”
Opportunity to highlight your work!
2012 - 2013 Activities: Voter Registration & Simulations
September 24-28
Kids Voting USA-Brownsville, in collaboration with the Cameron County Elections
office will be registering eligible students to vote. Students will also have the opportunity
to participate in a live voting simulation. All students will be able to participate in the
simulation and learn how to cast their vote come Election Day!
October 1 – 9
Campuses are asked to conduct a voter registration simulation and “register” their
students to vote for the upcoming elections. Registration simulation can be done as a
classroom assignment. The simulation activity is located on the KVUSA Educator login
page or a teacher can create their own registration simulation.
October 15 – 19
Voter Guide will be available online for printing. Teachers help their students learn about the candidates that they
will be voting for in the upcoming elections.
October 22 – 30 & November 1
Voting window will open for votes to be cast. Students will be able to vote from 8 a.m. – 4 p.m. each weekday.
Teachers are asked to take a voting roster of their students so that students can “sign in” before they cast their votes.
An assigned student can act as an Election Worker to further enhance the voting process.
November 1
Kids Voting USA Brownsville day can be celebrated on each campus as the election window ends.Please submit
photos of your activities.
November 7
Election Results will be available online.
2012 - 2013 Activities: High School Student Councils
September 15
8 a.m. – 3 p.m.
High School Student Council members and their advisors are invited to register to participate in the 2012 Student
Organization Leadership Development training. Space is limited and will only allow 30 attendees. The training will
be held on the UTB and TSC campus and will cover items such as Parliamentary Procedures, Conflict Resolution,
Team Building, etc. Student Council groups will initially be limited to four to five members; additional members
will be placed on a waiting list. This will allow KVUSA-B to offer the opportunity to all student council groups.
October 20
Civic engagement is an important part of being a responsible citizen. All high school Student Council groups are
asked to join in making a difference in their community by participating in Build a Better Block activities related to
voter education. Kids Voting USA-Brownsville will join together with many community organizations to revitalize
downtown Brownsville. More information will be sent to KVUSA-B Campus Liaisons to distribute to their
campus’ Student Council Advisor.
DoubleClick Democracy
Webinar Materials
Frequently Asked Questions
DoubleClick Democracy is an online voting service hosted by Kids Voting USA. Students can participate in
an authentic voting experience by using this Web-based voting system. The online voting ballots replicate
the races and issues that are on the adult ballot for each electoral district.
Why Online Voting?
Online voting provides a nontraditional and progressive means to introduce students to voting and the
political process. It is not a replacement for Kids Voting USA’s traditional paper balloting, but offers an
alternative in recognition of the fact that, in some communities, it is the most feasible way to enable a
complete Kids Voting experience for students.
How it works….
The system allows students to vote two different ways. The preferred method is where each student
receives his or her own individualized voter identification number. The unlock code is the second method.
With this process, each ballot has its own unlock code and school code. The user creates these codes.
Individualized Voter IDs: Every school building in the district is given voting codes (called voter id’s) that
reflect the number students enrolled in their building and then each teacher will get codes assigned to them
for their entire class. For example, Superior Elementary School’s 2nd grade class of Mrs. Johnson’s has 24
students. She will be given up to 35 random voting codes that she can assign to each of her students.
During the actual voting, an adult will have the voting screen up at the school building “polling site”.
Students input their individual voting code to begin. All voting codes only can be used once. Students enter
their 8 digit code, the system recognizes that student from a certain school and the age appropriate ballot
will appear. If a student gets disconnected while voting, re-entering the voting code is allowed and the
student will restart the voting process where he or she left off. Once the student has voted online and
submits, the code cannot be used again and a message that they have already voted in this election will
appear. Student voting codes are not linked in any way to a particular student.
Voting Results…
Voting results are automatically tabulated and easily accessed by the Kids Voting staff. This will eliminate
the counting of ballots and reporting of results that can be time consuming for such large districts and
communities. Additionally, the Kids Voting staff can create logins for individuals to review the results
themselves.
Kids Voting USA – 5423 SW 7th St. Topeka, KS 66606 – (785) 271-6350
DoubleClick Democracy
Q&A
Question: Will each ballot have its own url?
Answer: Yes, each ballot will have its own url.
Question: How many races can you put on a ballot?
Answer: As many as needed; there is not a limit.
Question: Can an amendment question be included on the ballot?
Answer: Yes, an amendment question can be included on the ballot.
Question: Can survey type questions be included on the ballot?
Answer: Yes, survey type questions can be included on the ballot.
Question: Can the ballot be printed?
Answer: Yes, the ballot can be saved as a pdf and then printed off.
Question: Can the results be printed?
Answer: Yes, the results can be saved as a pdf or excel file and then printed off.
Question: Will the affiliate administrators be able to view other affiliates’ ballots?
Answer: No, each administrator will only be able to view his or her ballot(s).
Question: Can pictures be uploaded onto the ballot?
Answer: Yes, pictures can be uploaded onto the ballot. Pictures cannot be any larger than 50kb
(kilobyte).
Question: Can affiliates upload school and teacher information from excel into the online voting
system?
Answer: Yes, information can be uploaded from excel into the system. Once the school and
teacher information has been entered, it will always be there.
Question: Can the ballot be duplicated?
Answer: Yes, the ballot can be duplicated if needed.
Question: Is ballot accessible on smart phones?
Answer: Yes, the ballot is accessible on some smart phones. However, it is not developed for
smart phones. This could be a potential upgrade feature after the pilot program if it is needed.
1
Question: Does the ballot require a certain level of internet connections/computer operating
system?
Answer: No, the DoubleClick Democracy works on all internet connections. It is light and fast.
The administrator portion may require java updates (free and easy to install). The voting portal
requires no java scripts and runs on all computer operating systems.
Question: Is the ballot English only?
Answer: Currently, ballot items cannot be created in Spanish. There are no plans to install a
language translator, as they are not 100 percent reliable.
Question: Does the system require a unique voter identification number?
Answer: No, administrators can choose to use a generic voter identification number for their
ballot.
Question: Can the system be used for other elections or contests?
Answer: Yes, DoubleClick Democracy can be used for student government elections, prom,
poster contest, etc.
2
Celebrate Freedom
Week
Social Studies TEKS
1776 Timeline
Declaration of Independence
Constitution
Bill of Rights
Branches of Government
Celebrate Freedom Week: Social Studies TEKS
Kindergarten Social Studies TEKS…..
(6) Students understand that a constitutional republic is a representative form of government whose
representatives derive their authority from the consent of the governed, serve for an established tenure,
and are sworn to uphold the constitution.
(7) Students must demonstrate learning performance related to any federal and state mandates regarding
classroom instruction. Although Kindergarten is not required to participate in Celebrate Freedom Week,
according to the TEC, §29.907, primary grades lay the foundation for subsequent learning. As a result,
Kindergarten Texas essential knowledge and skills include standards related to this patriotic observance.
(8) Students identify and discuss how the actions of U.S. citizens and the local, state, and federal
governments have either met or failed to meet the ideals espoused in the founding documents.
First Grade Social Studies TEKS…..
(6) Students understand that a constitutional republic is a representative form of government whose
representatives derive their authority from the consent of the governed, serve for an established tenure,
and are sworn to uphold the constitution. 2
(7) Students must demonstrate learning performance related to any federal and state mandates regarding
classroom instruction. Although Grade 1 is not required to participate in Celebrate Freedom Week,
according to the TEC, §29.907, primary grades lay the foundation for subsequent learning. As a result,
Grade 1 Texas essential knowledge and skills include standards related to this patriotic observance.
(8) Students identify and discuss how the actions of U.S. citizens and the local, state, and federal
governments have either met or failed to meet the ideals espoused in the founding documents.
Second Grade Social Studies TEKS…..
(6) Students understand that a constitutional republic is a representative form of government whose
representatives derive their authority from the consent of the governed, serve for an established tenure,
and are sworn to uphold the constitution.
(7) Students must demonstrate learning performance related to any federal and state mandates regarding
classroom instruction. Although Grade 2 is not required to participate in Celebrate Freedom Week,
according to the TEC, §29.907, primary grades lay the foundation for subsequent learning. As a result,
Grade 2 Texas essential knowledge and skills include standards related to this patriotic observance.
(8) Students identify and discuss how the actions of U.S. citizens and the local, state, and federal
governments have either met or failed to meet the ideals espoused in the founding documents.
Third Grade to Twelfth Grade Social Studies TEKS…..
(6) Students understand that a constitutional republic is a representative form of government whose
representatives derive their authority from the consent of the governed, serve for an established tenure,
and are sworn to uphold the constitution. 2
(7) State and federal laws mandate a variety of celebrations and observances, including Celebrate
Freedom Week.
(A) Each social studies class shall include, during Celebrate Freedom Week as provided under the
TEC, §29.907, or during another full school week as determined by the board of trustees of a school
district, appropriate instruction concerning the intent, meaning, and importance of the Declaration of
Independence and the U.S. Constitution, including the Bill of Rights, in their historical contexts. The
study of the Declaration of Independence must include the study of the relationship of the ideas expressed
in that document to subsequent American history, including the relationship of its ideas to the rich
diversity of our people as a nation of immigrants, the American Revolution, the formulation of the U.S.
Constitution, and the abolitionist movement, which led to the Emancipation Proclamation and the
women's suffrage movement.
(B) Each school district shall require that, during Celebrate Freedom Week or other week of
instruction prescribed under subparagraph (A) of this paragraph, students in Grades 3-12 study and recite
the following text: "We hold these Truths to be self-evident, that all Men are created equal, that they are
endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable Rights, that among these are Life, Liberty and the
Pursuit of Happiness--That to secure these Rights, Governments are instituted among Men, deriving their
just Powers from the Consent of the Governed."
(8) Students identify and discuss how the actions of U.S. citizens and the local, state, and federal
governments have either met or failed to meet the ideals espoused in the founding documents.
1776 American Timeline
June 7 Congress, meeting in Philadelphia, receives Richard Henry Lee's resolution
urging Congress to declare independence.
June 11 Thomas Jefferson, John Adams, Benjamin Franklin, Roger Sherman, and
Robert R. Livingston appointed to a committee to draft a declaration of independence.
American army retreats to Lake Champlain from Canada.
June 12-27 Jefferson, at the request of the committee, drafts a declaration, of which
only a fragment exists. Jefferson's clean, or "fair" copy, the "original Rough draught," is
reviewed by the committee. Both documents are in the manuscript collections of the
Library of Congress.
June 28 A fair copy of the committee draft of the Declaration of Independence is read in
Congress.
July 1-4 Congress debates and revises the Declaration of Independence.
July 2 Congress declares independence as the British fleet and army arrive at New
York.
July 4 Congress adopts the Declaration of Independence in the morning of a bright,
sunny, but cool Philadelphia day. John Dunlap prints the Declaration of Independence.
These prints are now called "Dunlap Broadsides." Twenty-four copies are known to
exist, two of which are in the Library of Congress. One of these was Washington's
personal copy.
July 5 John Hancock, president of the Continental Congress, dispatches the first of
Dunlap's broadsides of the Declaration of Independence to the legislatures of New
Jersey and Delaware.
July 6 Pennsylvania Evening Post of July 6 prints the first newspaper rendition of the
Declaration of Independence.
July 8 The first public reading of the Declaration is in Philadelphia.
July 9 Washington orders that the Declaration of Independence be read before the
American army in New York
July 19 Congress orders the Declaration of Independence engrossed (officially
inscribed) and signed by members.
August 2 Delegates begin to sign engrossed copy of the Declaration of Independence.
A large British reinforcement arrives at New York after being repelled at Charleston,
S.C.
Declaration of Independence
Philadelphia May 1775
To What Extent:

•
•
•
•

“The Declaration of Independence has been
variously interpreted as:
A bid for French support
An attempt to swing uncommitted
Americans to the revolutionary cause
A statement of universal principles
An affirmation of the traditional rights
as Englishmen.”
To what extent are these
interpretations in conflict?
Second Continental Congress




May 1775
Delegates meet in Philadelphia
Movement toward Independence is
growing
British Government (Lord North) is not
interested in negotiation.
“Common Sense”




Thomas Paine, a middle aged English
immigrant to the colonies
Friend of Ben Franklin
In January 1776 Wrote a pamphlet that
argued it was “Common Sense” that the
binds that tie the colonies to England be
broken (500,000 copies were sold in a few
years)
Paine was a wonderful Propagandist
Common Sense



Paine argued
It was contrary to common sense for a large
continent to be ruled by a small distant island
and for people to pledge allegiance to a king
whose government was corrupt and whose
laws were unreasonable.
Persuaded thousands of colonists to call for
independence
“Common Sense”

“O! ye that love mankind! Ye that dare
oppose not only the tyranny but the tyrant,
stand forth! Every spot of the Old World is
overrun with oppression. Freedom hath been
hunted around the globe. Asia and Africa
have long expelled her. Europe regards her
as a stranger and England hath given her
warning to depart. O! receive the fugitive
and prepare in time an asylum for mankind.”
Independence in Congress





Richard Henry Lee, of Virginia, June 7, 1776,
introduced a resolution to the Continental
Congress, “These United Colonies are, and of
right ought to be free and independent
states.”
Delegates debated three weeks
A committee was formed, Jefferson, Adams,
Franklin, Livingston, and Sherman
Jefferson was asked to write the document
Took two weeks
Independence Declared
July 4, 1776


Jefferson included Enlightenment ideas
most notably from Locke
“We hold these truths to be selfevident: All men are created equal; that
they are endowed by their creator with
certain unalienable rights; that among
these are life liberty and the pursuit of
happiness.”
Declaration of Independence,
1776




Most Americans did not desire independence;
proud to be British citizens
B. Reasons for shift of loyalty
1. Hiring of Hessians
2. Burning of Falmouth & Norfolk by the British
3. Governor of Virginia promised freedom to slaves who
would fight for Britain.
Impact: persuaded many southern elite to join New
England in the war effort.
Thomas Paine’s Common Sense (1776)
1. Became an instant best-seller in the colonies; effective
propaganda
Main ideas:
Britain's colonial policies were inconsistent;
independence was the only course
Declaration of Independence



What did the
Declaration of
Independence say?
How is the Declaration
of Independence
organized?
What do you have to
do?
How is the Declaration of
Independence organized?
The Document is divided
into four parts:
 Preamble: announces
the reasons for the
document, explains why
colonists chose to
separate from England
 Political Principles: a
section identifies the
ideas underlying the
rights of the people,
John Locke’s ideas
•
•
The Declaration:
the statement that
these 13 colonies are
now independent
Complaints: the
document lists the
unfair acts
perpetrated by the
British Government
Assignment
Read the Declaration of Independence
While you read look for the following items:
1. Find evidence of Enlightenment ideas in the declaration.
2. What reasons do the colonists cite for separating from
England? (Name 5)
3. List the complaints of the Colonists. (list 3 of them)
4. Why does Jefferson say the colonists should separate?
(See paragraph 4).
5 There are 12 "facts" that Jefferson uses to make his points.
Check them and determine if they are fact or opinion.
6. What acts of war do the colonists claim the king has
perpetrated?
The Declaration of Independence
Historical Context
Thomas Jefferson
About The Author
• Born on April 13, 1743 in
Virginia to a wealthy family.
• He was very well educated.
Attended The College of
William & Mary.
• Served in the Virginia House
of Burgesses.
• Eloquent correspondent, but
not good public speaker
• Known as the "silent
member" of the Congress
• Was unanimously chosen by
the Committee of Five to
prepare a draft of the
Declaration alone.
Major Events of The Time
• Common Sense is published
• North Carolina produces the Halifax Resolves
making it the first British colony to officially
authorize its delegates to vote for independence.
• Richard Henry Lee of Virginia proposes a
resolution calling for a Declaration of
Independence.
• Virginia Declaration of Rights by George Mason is
adopted by the Virginia Convention of Delegates.
• The Delaware General Assembly votes to suspend
government under the British Crown
Intended Audience
• The audience were those
wanting independence from
England.
• International audience
Jefferson’s Viewpoint on the Major Issues of His Time
• He believed in the separation of church and
state.
• He believed that the colonies had the right to
overthrow a tyrannical government.
Main Points of the Declaration of Independence
• All men are created equal.
“We hold these Truths to be self-evident, that all men
are created equal.
• Men are given by God certain unalienable rights.
“They are endowed, by their Creator, with certain
unalienable rights, that among these are Life, liberty
and the Pursuit of Happiness.”
• We have the natural right by God to declare our
independence from England.
“When in the course of human events it becomes
necessary for one people to dissolve the political
bands which have connected them with another, and
to assume among the Powers of the earth, the
separate and equal station to which the Laws of
Nature and of Nature’s God entitle them…
Main Points of the Declaration of Independence
• Governments derive their authority from the consent of
the people.
“Governments are instituted among Men, deriving their
just powers from the consent of the governed.”
• When a government abuses it’s power, the people have
the right to overthrow it.
“That whenever any form of Government becomes
destructive to these ends, it is the Right of the People
to alter or to abolish it…
• The colonies tried repeatedly to compromise with King
George, but has been a tyrant.
“Such has been the patient sufferance of these Colonies;
and such is now the necessity which constrains them
to alter their former Systems of Government.
Thomas Jefferson, The Declaration of Independence
Historical Significance
• The American Colonies finally declared
their independence from England
• It was the first step in the creation of a new
nation.
Background Information to the Declaration of Independence
The Declaration of Independence was a statement adopted by the Continental Congress on July
4, 1776, which announced that the thirteen American colonies then at war with Great Britain
regarded themselves as independent states, and no longer a part of the British Empire. John
Adams put forth a resolution earlier in the year which made a formal declaration inevitable. A
committee was assembled to draft the formal declaration, which was to be ready when congress
voted on independence. Adams persuaded the committee to select Thomas Jefferson to compose
the original draft of the document, which congress would edit to produce the final version. The
Declaration was ultimately a formal explanation of why Congress had voted on July 2 to declare
independence from Great Britain, more than a year after the outbreak of the American
Revolutionary War. The birthday of the United States of America—Independence Day—is
celebrated on July 4, the day the wording of the Declaration was approved by Congress.
After finalizing the text on July 4, Congress issued the Declaration of Independence in several
forms. It was initially published as a printed broadside that was widely distributed and read to the
public. The most famous version of the Declaration, a signed copy that is usually regarded as the
Declaration of Independence, is on display at the National Archives in Washington, D.C.
Although the wording of the Declaration was approved on July 4, the date of its signing has been
disputed. Most historians have concluded that it was signed nearly a month after its adoption, on
August 2, 1776, and not on July 4 as is commonly believed. The original July 4 United States
Declaration of Independence manuscript was lost while all other copies have been derived from
this original document.
The sources and interpretation of the Declaration have been the subject of much scholarly
inquiry. The Declaration justified the independence of the United States by listing colonial
grievances against King George III, and by asserting certain natural and legal rights, including a
right of revolution. Having served its original purpose in announcing independence, the text of
the Declaration was initially ignored after the American Revolution. Its stature grew over the
years, particularly the second sentence, a sweeping statement of human rights:
We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal, that they are endowed
by their Creator with certain unalienable Rights, that among these are Life, Liberty and the
pursuit of Happiness.
This sentence has been called "one of the best-known sentences in the English language" and
"the most potent and consequential words in American history". The passage has often been used
to promote the rights of marginalized people throughout the world, and came to represent a
moral standard for which the United States should strive. This view was notably promoted by
Abraham Lincoln, who considered the Declaration to be the foundation of his political
philosophy, and argued that the Declaration is a statement of principles through which the United
States Constitution should be interpreted.
The Unanimous Declaration of the Thirteen United States of America
When, in the course of human events, it becomes necessary for one people to dissolve the
political bands which have connected them with another, and to assume among the powers of the
earth, the separate and equal station to which the laws of nature and of nature's God entitle them,
a decent respect to the opinions of mankind requires that they should declare the causes which
impel them to the separation.
We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal, that they are endowed by
their Creator with certain unalienable rights that among these are life, liberty and the pursuit of
happiness. That to secure these rights, governments are instituted among men, deriving their just
powers from the consent of the governed. That whenever any form of government becomes
destructive to these ends, it is the right of the people to alter or to abolish it, and to institute new
government, laying its foundation on such principles and organizing its powers in such form, as
to them shall seem most likely to affect their safety and happiness. Prudence, indeed, will dictate
that governments long established should not be changed for light and transient causes; and
accordingly all experience hath shown that mankind are more disposed to suffer, while evils are
sufferable, than to right themselves by abolishing the forms to which they are accustomed. But
when a long train of abuses and usurpations, pursuing invariably the same object evinces a
design to reduce them under absolute despotism, it is their right, it is their duty, to throw off such
government, and to provide new guards for their future security. — Such has been the patient
sufferance of these colonies; and such is now the necessity which constrains them to alter their
former systems of government. The history of the present King of Great Britain is a history of
repeated injuries and usurpations, all having in direct object the establishment of an absolute
tyranny over these states. To prove this, let facts be submitted to a candid world.
He has refused his assent to laws, the most wholesome and necessary for the public good.
He has forbidden his governors to pass laws of immediate and pressing importance, unless
suspended in their operation till his assent should be obtained; and when so suspended, he has
utterly neglected to attend to them.
He has refused to pass other laws for the accommodation of large districts of people, unless those
people would relinquish the right of representation in the legislature, a right inestimable to them
and formidable to tyrants only.
He has called together legislative bodies at places unusual, uncomfortable, and distant from the
depository of their public records, for the sole purpose of fatiguing them into compliance with
his measures.
He has dissolved representative houses repeatedly, for opposing with manly firmness his
invasions on the rights of the people.
He has refused for a long time, after such dissolutions, to cause others to be elected; whereby the
legislative powers, incapable of annihilation, have returned to the people at large for their
exercise; the state remaining in the meantime exposed to all the dangers of invasion from
without, and convulsions within.
He has endeavored to prevent the population of these states; for that purpose obstructing the laws
for naturalization of foreigners; refusing to pass others to encourage their migration hither, and
raising the conditions of new appropriations of lands.
He has obstructed the administration of justice, by refusing his assent to laws for establishing
judiciary powers.
He has made judges dependent on his will alone, for the tenure of their offices, and the amount
and payment of their salaries.
He has erected a multitude of new offices, and sent hither swarms of officers to harass our
people, and eat out their substance.
He has kept among us, in times of peace, standing armies without the consent of our legislature.
He has affected to render the military independent of and superior to civil power.
He has combined with others to subject us to a jurisdiction foreign to our constitution, and
unacknowledged by our laws; giving his assent to their acts of pretended legislation:
For quartering large bodies of armed troops among us:
For protecting them, by mock trial, from punishment for any murders which they should commit
on the inhabitants of these states:
For cutting off our trade with all parts of the world:
For imposing taxes on us without our consent:
For depriving us in many cases, of the benefits of trial by jury:
For transporting us beyond seas to be tried for pretended offenses:
For abolishing the free system of English laws in a neighboring province, establishing therein an
arbitrary government, and enlarging its boundaries so as to render it at once an example and fit
instrument for introducing the same absolute rule in these colonies:
For taking away our charters, abolishing our most valuable laws, and altering fundamentally the
forms of our governments:
For suspending our own legislatures and declaring themselves invested with power to legislate
for us in all cases whatsoever.
He has abdicated government here, by declaring us out of his protection and waging war against
us.
He has plundered our seas, ravaged our coasts, burned our towns, and destroyed the lives of our
people.
He is at this time transporting large armies of foreign mercenaries to complete the works of
death, desolation and tyranny, already begun with circumstances of cruelty and perfidy scarcely
paralleled in the most barbarous ages, and totally unworthy of the head of a civilized nation.
He has constrained our fellow citizens taken captive on the high seas to bear arms against their
country, to become the executioners of their friends and brethren, or to fall themselves by their
hands.
He has excited domestic insurrections amongst us, and has endeavored to bring on the
inhabitants of our frontiers, the merciless Indian savages, whose known rule of warfare is
undistinguished destruction of all ages, sexes and conditions.
In every stage of these oppressions we have petitioned for redress in the most humble terms: our
repeated petitions have been answered only by repeated injury. A prince, whose character is thus
marked by every act which may define a tyrant, is unfit to be the ruler of a free people.
Nor have we been wanting in attention to our British brethren. We have warned them from time
to time of attempts by their legislature to extend an unwarrantable jurisdiction over us. We have
reminded them of the circumstances of our emigration and settlement here. We have appealed to
their native justice and magnanimity, and we have conjured them by the ties of our common
kindred to disavow these usurpations, which would inevitably interrupt our connections and
correspondence. They too have been deaf to the voice of justice and of consanguinity. We must,
therefore, acquiesce in the necessity, which denounces our separation, and hold them, as we hold
the rest of mankind, enemies in war, in peace friends.
We, therefore, the representatives of the United States of America, in General Congress,
assembled, appealing to the Supreme Judge of the world for the rectitude of our intentions, do, in
the name, and by the authority of the good people of these colonies, solemnly publish and
declare, that these united colonies are, and of right ought to be free and independent states; that
they are absolved from all allegiance to the British Crown, and that all political connection
between them and the state of Great Britain, is and ought to be totally dissolved; and that as free
and independent states, they have full power to levy war, conclude peace, contract alliances,
establish commerce, and to do all other acts and things which independent states may of right do.
And for the support of this declaration, with a firm reliance on the protection of Divine
Providence, we mutually pledge to each other our lives, our fortunes and our sacred honor.
Name: ________________________ Date: _______
Excerpt from the Declaration of Independence
We hold these truths to be self-evident,
that all men are created equal,
that they are endowed by their Creator
with certain unalienable rights,
that among these are life, liberty and
the pursuit of happiness.
We hold these truths to be self-evident,
that all men are created equal,
that they are endowed by their Creator
with certain unalienable rights,
that among these are life, liberty and the
pursuit of happiness.
That to secure these rights,
governments are instituted among men,
deriving their just powers from the
consent of the governed.
That to secure these rights,
governments are instituted among men,
deriving their just powers from the
consent of the governed.
We hold these truths to be self-evident,
that all men are created equal,
that they are endowed by their Creator
with certain unalienable rights,
that among these are life, liberty and the
pursuit of happiness.
We hold these truths to be self-evident,
that all men are created equal,
that they are endowed by their Creator
with certain unalienable rights,
that among these are life, liberty and the
pursuit of happiness.
That to secure these rights,
governments are instituted among men,
deriving their just powers from the
consent of the governed.
That to secure these rights,
governments are instituted among men,
deriving their just powers from the
consent of the governed.
We hold these truths to be self-evident,
that all men are created equal,
that they are endowed by their Creator
with certain unalienable rights,
that among these are life, liberty and the
pursuit of happiness.
We hold these truths to be self-evident,
that all men are created equal,
that they are endowed by their Creator
with certain unalienable rights,
that among these are life, liberty and the
pursuit of happiness.
That to secure these rights,
governments are instituted among men,
deriving their just powers from the
consent of the governed.
That to secure these rights,
governments are instituted among men,
deriving their just powers from the
consent of the governed.
The Principles of the
United States Constitution
I. Popular Sovereignty
The people hold the ultimate authority
A representative democracy lets the people
elect leaders to make decisions for them.
Orrin Hatch, Bob Bennett, and Chris
Cannon are our elected officials in Congress
II. Limited Government
Framers wanted to guard against tyranny
Government is limited to the power given
them in the Constitution.
The Constitution tells how leaders who
overstep their power can be removed
III. Federalism
The division of power between State and
National Governments
Some powers are shared
The National Government has the “supreme
power”
IV. Separation of Powers
No one holds “too much” power
Legislative branch makes the laws
Executive branch carries out the laws
Legislative branch interprets the laws
Legislative Branch
Senate and House of Representatives
Make our laws
Appropriate Money
Regulate Immigration
Establish Post Offices and Roads
Regulate Interstate Commerce and
Transportation
Declare War
Executive Branch
The President of the United States
Chief Executive
Chief of State
Chief Legislator
Commander in Chief
Judicial Branch
Supreme Court and other Federal Courts
Preserve and protect the rights guaranteed
by the Constitution
Considers cases involving national laws
Declares laws and acts “unconstitutional”
V. Checks and Balances
Prevents the abuse of power in government
Each branch can check each other branch
Executive Checks
Propose laws to Congress
Veto laws made by Congress
Negotiate foreign treaties
Appoint federal judges
Grant pardons to federal offenders
Legislative Checks
Override president’s veto
Ratify treaties
Confirm executive appointments
Impeach federal officers and judges
Create and dissolve lower federal courts
Judicial Checks
Declare executive acts unconstitutional
Declare laws unconstitutional
Declare acts of Congress unconstitutional
The Supreme Court holds the final check
United States (U.S.) Constitution & Amendments
The U.S. Constitution is one of the most influential legal documents in existence. Since its creation some two
hundred years ago, over one hundred countries around the world have used it as a model for their own.
And it is a living document. It is one of the world's oldest surviving constitutions. And, while the Supreme Court
continually interprets the Constitution so as to reflect a rapidly changing world, its basic tenets have remained
virtually unchanged since its inception and unchallenged as well. People quarrel over its interpretation, but
never do they question the wisdom of its underlying principles. Imagine creating a document that governs your
grandchildren's grandchildren's grandchildren! That's what the men of the 1787 Constitutional Convention did.
The Constitution of the United States
Article I • Article II • Article III • Article IV • Article V • Article VI • Article VII
The signing of the Constitution took place on September 17, 1787, at the Pennsylvania State House (now called
Independence Hall) in Philadelphia.
PREAMBLE
We the People of the United States, in Order to form a more perfect Union, establish Justice, insure domestic
Tranquility, provide for the common defense, promote the general Welfare, and secure the Blessings of Liberty
to ourselves and our Posterity, do ordain and establish this Constitution for the United States of America.
Article I.
THE LEGISLATIVE BRANCH
Section 1. All legislative Powers herein granted shall be vested in a Congress of the United States, which shall
consist of a Senate and House of Representatives.
THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES
Section 2. [1] The House of Representatives shall be composed of Members chosen every second Year by the
People of the several States, and the Electors in each State shall have the Qualifications requisite for Electors of
the most numerous Branch of the State Legislature.
[2] No Person shall be a Representative who shall not have attained to the Age of twenty-five Years, and been
seven Years a Citizen of the United States, and who shall not, when elected, be an Inhabitant of that State in
which he shall be chosen.
[3] [Representatives and direct Taxes shall be apportioned among the several States which may be included
within this Union, according to their respective Numbers, which shall be determined by adding to the whole
Number of free Persons, including those bound to Service for a Term of Years, and excluding Indians not
taxed, three fifths of all other Persons.] (Note: Changed by section 2 of the Fourteenth Amendment.) The actual
Enumeration shall be made within three Years after the first Meeting of the Congress of the United States, and
within every subsequent Term of ten Years, in such Manner as they shall by Law direct. The Number of
Representatives shall not exceed one for every thirty Thousand, but each State shall have at Least one
Representative; and until such enumeration shall be made, the State of New Hampshire shall be entitled to
choose three, Massachusetts eight, Rhode-Island and Providence Plantations one, Connecticut five, New-York
six, New Jersey four, Pennsylvania eight, Delaware one, Maryland six, Virginia ten, North Carolina five, South
Carolina five, and Georgia three.
[4] When vacancies happen in the Representation from any state, the Executive Authority thereof shall issue
Writs of Election to fill such Vacancies.
[5] The House of Representatives shall choose their Speaker and other Officers; and shall have the sole Power
of Impeachment.
THE SENATE
Section 3. [1] The Senate of the United States shall be composed of two Senators from each State, [chosen by
the Legislature thereof,] (Note: Changed by section 1 of the Seventeenth Amendment.) for six Years; and each
Senator shall have one Vote.
[2] Immediately after they shall be assembled in Consequence of the first Election, they shall be divided as
equally as may be into three Classes. The Seats of the Senators of the first Class shall be vacated at the
Expiration of the second Year, of the second Class at the Expiration of the fourth Year, and of the third Class at
the Expiration of the sixth Year, so that one-third may be chosen every second Year; [and if Vacancies happen
by Resignation, or otherwise, during the Recess of the Legislature of any State, the Executive thereof may make
temporary Appointments until the next Meeting of the Legislature, which shall then fill such Vacancies.] (Note:
Changed by clause 2 of the Seventeenth Amendment.)
[3] No Person shall be a Senator who shall not have attained to the Age of thirty Years, and been nine Years a
Citizen of the United States, and who shall not, when elected, be an Inhabitant of that State for which he shall
be chosen.
[4] The Vice President of the United States shall be President of the Senate, but shall have no Vote, unless they
be equally divided.
[5] The Senate shall choose their other Officers, and also a President pro tempore, in the Absence of the Vice
President, or when he shall exercise the Office of President of the United States.
[6] The Senate shall have the sole Power to try all Impeachments. When sitting for that Purpose, they shall be
on Oath or Affirmation. When the President of the United States is tried, the Chief Justice shall preside: And no
Person shall be convicted without the Concurrence of two thirds of the Members present.
[7] Judgment in Cases of Impeachment shall not extend further than to removal from Office, and
disqualification to hold and enjoy any Office of honor, Trust or Profit under the United States: but the Party
convicted shall nevertheless be liable and subject to Indictment, Trial, Judgment and Punishment, according to
Law.
THE ORGANIZATION OF CONGRESS
Section 4. [1] The Times, Places and Manner of holding Elections for Senators and Representatives, shall be
prescribed in each State by the Legislature thereof; but the Congress may at any time by Law make or alter such
Regulations, except as to the Place of Choosing Senators.
[2] The Congress shall assemble at least once in every Year, and such Meeting shall be [on the first Monday in
December,] (Note: Changed by section 2 of the Twentieth Amendment.) unless they shall by Law appoint a
different Day.
Section 5. [1] Each House shall be the Judge of the Elections, Returns and Qualifications of its own Members,
and a Majority of each shall constitute a Quorum to do Business; but a smaller number may adjourn from day
to day, and may be authorized to compel the Attendance of absent Members, in such Manner, and under such
Penalties as each House may provide.
[2] Each House may determine the Rules of its Proceedings, punish its Members for disorderly Behavior, and,
with the Concurrence of two thirds, expel a Member.
[3] Each House shall keep a Journal of its Proceedings, and from time to time publish the same, excepting such
Parts as may in their Judgment require Secrecy; and the Yeas and Nays of the Members of either House on any
question shall, at the Desire of one fifth of those Present, be entered on the Journal.
[4] Neither House, during the Session of Congress, shall, without the Consent of the other, adjourn for more
than three days, nor to any other Place than that in which the two Houses shall be sitting.
Section 6. [1] The Senators and Representatives shall receive a Compensation for their Services, to be
ascertained by Law, and paid out of the Treasury of the United States. They shall in all Cases, except Treason,
Felony and Breach of the Peace, be privileged from Arrest during their Attendance at the Session of their
respective Houses, and in going to and returning from the same; and for any Speech or Debate in either House,
they shall not be questioned in any other Place.
[2] No Senator or Representative shall, during the Time for which he was elected, be appointed to any civil
Office under the Authority of the United States, which shall have been created, or the Emoluments whereof
shall have been increased during such time; and no Person holding any Office under the United States, shall be
a Member of either House during his Continuance in Office.
Section 7. [1] All Bills for raising Revenue shall originate in the House of Representatives; but the Senate may
propose or concur with Amendments as on other Bills.
[2] Every Bill which shall have passed the House of Representatives and the Senate, shall, before it become a
Law, be presented to the President of the United States; If he approve he shall sign it, but if not he shall return
it, with his Objections to that House in which it shall have originated, who shall enter the Objections at large on
their Journal, and proceed to reconsider it. If after such Reconsideration two thirds of that House shall agree to
pass the Bill, it shall be sent, together with the Objections, to the other House, by which it shall likewise be
reconsidered, and if approved by two thirds of that House, it shall become a Law. But in all such Cases the Votes
of both Houses shall be determined by Yeas and Nays, and the Names of the Persons voting for and against the
Bill shall be entered on the Journal of each House respectively. If any Bill shall not be returned by the President
within ten Days (Sundays excepted) after it shall have been presented to him, the Same shall be a Law, in like
Manner as if he had signed it, unless the Congress by their Adjournment prevent its Return, in which Case it
shall not be a Law.
[3] Every Order, Resolution, or Vote to which the Concurrence of the Senate and House of Representatives may
be necessary (except on a question of Adjournment) shall be presented to the President of the United States;
and before the Same shall take Effect, shall be approved by him, or being disapproved by him, shall be repassed
by two thirds of the Senate and House of Representatives, according to the Rules and Limitations prescribed in
the Case of a Bill.
POWERS GRANTED TO CONGRESS
Section 8. [1] The Congress shall have Power To lay and collect Taxes, Duties, Imposts and Excises, to pay the
Debts and provide for the common Defense and general Welfare of the United States; but all Duties, Imposts
and Excises shall be uniform throughout the United States;
[2] To borrow money on the credit of the United States;
[3] To regulate Commerce with foreign Nations, and among the several States, and with the Indian Tribes;
[4] To establish an uniform Rule of Naturalization, and uniform Laws on the subject of Bankruptcies
throughout the United States;
[5] To coin Money, regulate the Value thereof, and of foreign Coin, and fix the Standard of Weights and
Measures;
[6] To provide for the Punishment of counterfeiting the Securities and current Coin of the United States;
[7] To establish Post Offices and post Roads;
[8] To promote the Progress of Science and useful Arts, by securing for limited Times to Authors and Inventors
the exclusive Right to their respective Writings and Discoveries;
[9] To constitute Tribunals inferior to the Supreme Court;
[10] To define and punish Piracies and Felonies committed on the high Seas, and Offenses against the Law of
Nations;
[11] To declare War, grant Letters of Marque and Reprisal, and make Rules concerning Captures on Land and
Water;
[12] To raise and support Armies, but no Appropriation of Money to that Use shall be for a longer Term than
two Years;
[13] To provide and maintain a Navy;
[14] To make Rules for the Government and Regulation of the land and naval Forces;
[15] To provide for calling forth the Militia to execute the Laws of the Union, suppress Insurrections and repel
Invasions;
[16] To provide for organizing, arming, and disciplining the Militia, and for governing such Part of them as may
be employed in the Service of the United States, reserving to the States respectively, the Appointment of the
Officers, and the Authority of training the Militia according to the discipline prescribed by Congress;
[17] To exercise exclusive Legislation in all Cases whatsoever, over such District (not exceeding ten Miles
square) as may, by Cession of particular States, and the acceptance of Congress, become the Seat of the
Government of the United States, and to exercise like Authority over all Places purchased by the Consent of the
Legislature of the State in which the Same shall be, for the Erection of Forts, Magazines, Arsenals, dock-Yards,
and other needful Buildings; —And
[18] To make all Laws which shall be necessary and proper for carrying into Execution the foregoing Powers,
and all other Powers vested by this Constitution in the Government of the United States, or in any Department
or Officer thereof.
POWER FORBIDDEN TO CONGRESS
Section 9. [1] The Migration or Importation of such Persons as any of the States now existing shall think proper
to admit, shall not be prohibited by the Congress prior to the Year one thousand eight hundred and eight, but a
tax or duty may be imposed on such Importation, not exceeding ten dollars for each Person.
[2] The privilege of the Writ of Habeas Corpus shall not be suspended, unless when in Cases of Rebellion or
Invasion the public Safety may require it.
[3] No Bill of Attainder or ex post facto Law shall be passed.
[4] No Capitation, or other direct, Tax shall be laid, unless in Proportion to the Census or Enumeration herein
before directed to be taken. (Note: See the Sixteenth Amendment.)
[5] No Tax or Duty shall be laid on Articles exported from any State.
[6] No Preference shall be given by any Regulation of Commerce or Revenue to the Ports of one State over those
of another: nor shall Vessels bound to, or from, one State, be obliged to enter, clear, or pay Duties in another.
[7] No Money shall be drawn from the Treasury, but in Consequence of Appropriations made by Law; and a
regular Statement and Account of the Receipts and Expenditures of all public Money shall be published from
time to time.
[8] No Title of Nobility shall be granted by the United States: And no Person holding any Office of Profit or
Trust under them, shall, without the Consent of the Congress, accept of any present, Emolument, Office, or
Title, of any kind whatever, from any King, Prince, or foreign State.
Section 10. [1] No State shall enter into any Treaty, Alliance, or Confederation; grant Letters of Marque and
Reprisal; coin Money; emit Bills of Credit; make any Thing but gold and silver Coin a Tender in Payment of
Debts; pass any Bill of Attainder, ex post facto Law, or Law impairing the Obligation of Contracts, or grant any
Title of Nobility.
[2] No State shall, without the Consent of the Congress, lay any Imposts or Duties on Imports or Exports,
except what may be absolutely necessary for executing its inspection Laws: and the net Produce of all Duties
and Imposts, laid by any State on Imports or Exports, shall be for the Use of the Treasury of the United States;
and all such Laws shall be subject to the Revision and Control of the Congress.
[3] No State shall, without the Consent of Congress, lay any duty of Tonnage, keep Troops, or Ships of War in
time of Peace, enter into any Agreement or Compact with another State, or with a foreign Power, or engage in
War, unless actually invaded, or in such imminent Danger as will not admit of delay.
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Article II.
THE EXECUTIVE BRANCH
Section 1. [1] The executive Power shall be vested in a President of the United States of America. He shall hold
his Office during the Term of four Years, and, together with the Vice-President, chosen for the same Term, be
elected, as follows.
[2] Each State shall appoint, in such Manner as the Legislature thereof may direct, a Number of Electors, equal
to the whole Number of Senators and Representatives to which the State may be entitled in the Congress: but
no Senator or Representative, or Person holding an Office of Trust or Profit under the United States, shall be
appointed an Elector.
[3] [The Electors shall meet in their respective States, and vote by Ballot for two persons, of whom one at least
shall not be an Inhabitant of the same State with themselves. And they shall make a List of all the Persons voted
for, and of the Number of Votes for each; which List they shall sign and certify, and transmit sealed to the Seat
of the Government of the United States, directed to the President of the Senate. The President of the Senate
shall, in the Presence of the Senate and House of Representatives, open all the Certificates, and the Votes shall
then be counted. The Person having the greatest Number of Votes shall be the President, if such Number be a
Majority of the whole Number of Electors appointed; and if there be more than one who have such Majority,
and have an equal Number of Votes, then the House of Representatives shall immediately choose by Ballot one
of them for President; and if no Person have a Majority, then from the five highest on the List the said House
shall in like Manner choose the President. But in choosing the President, the Votes shall be taken by States, the
Representation from each State have one Vote; a quorum for this Purpose shall consist of a Member or
Members from two thirds of the States, and a Majority of all the States shall be necessary to a Choice. In every
Case, after the Choice of the President, the Person having the greatest Number of Votes of the Electors shall be
the Vice President. But if there should remain two or more who have equal Votes, the Senate shall choose from
them by Ballot the Vice-President.] (Note: Superseded by the Twelfth Amendment.)
[4] The Congress may determine the Time of choosing the Electors, and the Day on which they shall give their
Votes; which Day shall be the same throughout the United States.
[5] No person except a natural born Citizen, or a Citizen of the United States, at the time of the Adoption of this
Constitution, shall be eligible to the Office of President; neither shall any person be eligible to that Office who
shall not have attained to the Age of thirty-five Years, and been fourteen Years a Resident within the United
States.
[6] [In Case of the Removal of the President from Office, or of his Death, Resignation, or Inability to discharge
the Powers and Duties of the said Office, the same shall devolve on the Vice President, and the Congress may by
Law, provide for the Case of Removal, Death, Resignation or Inability, both of the President and Vice President,
declaring what Officer shall then act as President, and such Officer shall act accordingly, until the Disability be
removed, or a President shall be elected.] (Note: Changed by the Twenty-Fifth Amendment.)
[7] The President shall, at stated Times, receive for his Services, a Compensation, which shall neither be
increased nor diminished during the Period for which he shall have been elected, and he shall not receive within
that Period any other Emolument from the United States, or any of them.
[8] Before he enter on the Execution of his Office, he shall take the following Oath or Affirmation: —“I do
solemnly swear (or affirm) that I will faithfully execute the Office of President of the United States, and will to
the best of my Ability, preserve, protect and defend the Constitution of the United States.”
Section 2. [1] The President shall be Commander in Chief of the Army and Navy of the United States, and of the
Militia of the several States, when called into the actual Service of the United States; he may require the
Opinion in writing, of the principal Officer in each of the executive Departments, upon any subject relating to
the Duties of their respective Offices, and he shall have Power to Grant Reprieves and Pardons for Offenses
against the United States, except in Cases of Impeachment.
[2] He shall have Power, by and with the Advice and Consent of the Senate, to make Treaties, provided twothirds of the Senators present concur; and he shall nominate, and by and with the Advice and Consent of the
Senate, shall appoint Ambassadors, other public Ministers and Consuls, Judges of the supreme Court, and all
other Officers of the United States, whose Appointments are not herein otherwise provided for, and which shall
be established by Law: but the Congress may by Law vest the Appointment of such inferior Officers, as they
think proper, in the President alone, in the Courts of Law, or in the Heads of Departments.
[3] The President shall have Power to fill up all Vacancies that may happen during the Recess of the Senate, by
granting Commissions which shall expire at the End of their next Session.
Section 3.He shall from time to time give to the Congress Information of the State of the Union, and
recommend to their Consideration such Measures as he shall judge necessary and expedient; he may, on
extraordinary Occasions, convene both Houses, or either of them, and in Case of Disagreement between them,
with Respect to the Time of Adjournment, he may adjourn them to such Time as he shall think proper; he shall
receive Ambassadors and other public Ministers; he shall take Care that the Laws be faithfully executed, and
shall Commission all the Officers of the United States.
Section 4.The President, Vice President and all civil Officers of the United States, shall be removed from Office
on Impeachment for, and Conviction of, Treason, Bribery, or other high Crimes and Misdemeanors.
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Article III.
THE JUDICIAL BRANCH
Section 1. The judicial Power of the United States, shall be vested in one supreme Court, and in such inferior
Courts as the Congress may from time to time ordain and establish. The Judges, both of the supreme and
inferior Courts, shall hold their Offices during good Behavior, and shall, at stated Times, receive for their
Services, a Compensation, which shall not be diminished during their Continuance in Office.
Section 2. [1] The judicial Power shall extend to all Cases, in Law and Equity, arising under this Constitution,
the Laws of the United States, and Treaties made, or which shall be made, under their Authority; —to all Cases
affecting Ambassadors, other public Ministers and Consuls; —to all Cases of admiralty and maritime
Jurisdiction; —to Controversies to which the United States shall be a Party; —to Controversies between two or
more States, —[between a State and Citizens of another State;—] (Note: Changed by the Eleventh Amendment.)
between Citizens of different States; —between Citizens of the same State claiming Lands under Grants of
different States, [and between a State, or the Citizens thereof, and foreign States, Citizens or Subjects.] (Note:
Changed by the Eleventh Amendment.)
[2] In all Cases affecting Ambassadors, other public Ministers and Consuls, and those in which a State shall be
Party, the supreme Court shall have original Jurisdiction. In all the other Cases before mentioned, the Supreme
Court shall have appellate Jurisdiction, both as to Law and Fact, with such Exceptions, and under such
Regulations as the Congress shall make.
[3] The Trial of all Crimes, except in Cases of Impeachment, shall be by Jury; and such Trial shall be held in the
State where the said Crimes shall have been committed; but when not committed within any State, the Trial
shall be at such Place or Places as the Congress may by Law have directed.
Section 3. [1] Treason against the United States, shall consist only in levying War against them, or in adhering
to their Enemies, giving them Aid and Comfort. No Person shall be convicted of Treason unless on the
Testimony of two Witnesses to the same overt Act, or on Confession in open Court.
[2] The Congress shall have Power to declare the Punishment of Treason, but no Attainder of Treason shall
work Corruption of Blood, or Forfeiture except during the Life of the Person attainted.
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Article IV.
RELATION OF THE STATES TO EACH OTHER
Section 1. Full Faith and Credit shall be given in each State to the public Acts, Records, and judicial Proceedings
of every other State; And the Congress may by general Laws prescribe the Manner in which such Acts, Records
and Proceedings shall be proved, and the Effect thereof.
Section 2. [1] The Citizens of each State shall be entitled to all Privileges and Immunities of Citizens in the
several States.
[2] A Person charged in any State with Treason, Felony, or other Crime, who shall flee from Justice, and be
found in another State, shall on demand of the executive Authority of the State from which he fled, be delivered
up, to be removed to the State having Jurisdiction of the Crime.
[3] [No Person held to Service or Labour in one State, under the Laws thereof, escaping into another, shall, in
Consequence of any Law or Regulation therein, be discharged from such Service or Labour, but shall be
delivered up on Claim of the Party to whom such Service or Labour may be due.] (Note: Superseded by the
Thirteenth Amendment.)
Section 3. [1] New States may be admitted by the Congress into this Union; but no new State shall be formed or
erected within the Jurisdiction of any other State; nor any State be formed by the Junction of two or more
States, or parts of States, without the Consent of the Legislatures of the States concerned as well as of the
Congress.
[2] The Congress shall have Power to dispose of and make all needful Rules and Regulations respecting the
Territory or other Property belonging to the United States; and nothing in this Constitution shall be so
construed as to Prejudice any Claims of the United States, or of any particular State.
Section 4. The United States shall guarantee to every State in this Union a Republican Form of Government,
and shall protect each of them against Invasion; and on Application of the Legislature, or of the Executive
(when the Legislature cannot be convened) against domestic Violence.
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Article V.
AMENDING THE CONSTITUTION
The Congress, whenever two thirds of both Houses shall deem it necessary, shall propose Amendments to this
Constitution, or, on the Application of the Legislatures of two thirds of the several States, shall call a
Convention for proposing Amendments, which, in either Case, shall be valid to all Intents and Purposes, as Part
of this Constitution, when ratified by the Legislatures of three fourths of the several States, or by Conventions in
three fourths thereof, as the one or the other Mode of Ratification may be proposed by the Congress; Provided
that no Amendment which may be made prior to the Year One thousand eight hundred and eight shall in any
Manner affect the first and fourth Clauses in the Ninth Section of the first Article; and that no State, without its
Consent, shall be deprived of it's equal Suffrage in the Senate.
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Article VI.
NATIONAL DEBTS
[1] All Debts contracted and Engagements entered into, before the Adoption of this Constitution, shall be as
valid against the United States under this Constitution, as under the Confederation.
SUPREMACY OF THE NATIONAL GOVERNMENT
[2] This Constitution, and the Laws of the United States which shall be made in Pursuance thereof; and all
Treaties made, or which shall be made, under the Authority of the United States, shall be the supreme Law of
the Land; and the Judges in every State shall be bound thereby, any Thing in the Constitution or Laws of any
State to the Contrary notwithstanding.
[3] The Senators and Representatives before mentioned, and the Members of the several State Legislatures, and
all executive and judicial Officers, both of the United States and of the several States, shall be bound by Oath or
Affirmation, to support this Constitution; but no religious Test shall ever be required as a Qualification to any
Office or public Trust under the United States.
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Article VII.
RATIFYING THE CONSTITUTION
The Ratification of the Conventions of nine States shall be sufficient for the Establishment of this Constitution
between the States so ratifying the Same.
Done in Convention by the Unanimous Consent of the States present the Seventeenth Day of September in the
Year of our Lord one thousand seven hundred and Eighty seven and of the Independence of the United States of
America the Twelfth.
In Witness whereof We have hereunto subscribed our Names.
George Washington-President and deputy from Virginia
New Hampshire
John Langdon
Nicholas Gilman
Massachusetts
Nathaniel Gorham
Rufus King
Connecticut
Wm. Saml. Johnson
Roger Sherman
New York
Alexander Hamilton
New Jersey
Wil: Livingston
David Brearley
Wm. Paterson
Jona: Dayton
Pennsylvania
B Franklin
Thomas Mifflin
Robt Morris
Geo. Clymer
Thos. FitzSimons
Jared Ingersoll
James Wilson
Delaware
Geo: Read
Gunning Bedford jun
John Dickinson
Richard Basset
Jaco: Broom
Maryland
James McHenry
Dan of St Thos. Jenifer
Danl Carroll
Virginia
John BlairJames Madison Jr.
North Carolina
Wm. Blount
Richd. Dobbs Spaight
Hu Williamson
South Carolina
J. Rutledge
Charles Cotesworth Pinckney
Charles Pinckney
Pierce Butler
Georgia
William Few
Gouv Morris
Abr Baldwin
Attest William Jackson Secretary
The Bill of Rights
Amendment I (1): Freedom of religion, speech, and the press; rights of assembly and petition
Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or
abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press, or the right of the people peaceably to assemble, and to
petition the Government for a redress of grievances.
Amendment II (2): Right to bear arms
A well regulated Militia, being necessary to the security of a free State, the right of the people to keep and bear
Arms, shall not be infringed.
Amendment III (3): Housing of soldiers
No Soldier shall, in time of peace be quartered in any house, without the consent of the Owner, nor in time of
war, but in a manner to be prescribed by law.
Amendment IV (4): Search and arrest warrants
The right of the people to be secure in their persons, houses, papers, and effects, against unreasonable searches
and seizures, shall not be violated, and no Warrants shall issue, but upon probable cause, supported by Oath or
affirmation, and particularly describing the place to be searched, and the persons or things to be seized.
Amendment V (5): Rights in criminal cases
No person shall be held to answer for a capital, or otherwise infamous crime, unless on a presentment or
indictment of a Grand Jury, except in cases arising in the land or naval forces, or in the Militia, when in actual
service in time of War or public danger; nor shall any person be subject for the same offence to be twice put in
jeopardy of life or limb, nor shall be compelled in any criminal case to be a witness against himself, nor be
deprived of life, liberty, or property, without due process of law; nor shall private property be taken for public
use without just compensation.
Amendment VI (6): Rights to a fair trial
In all criminal prosecutions, the accused shall enjoy the right to a speedy and public trial, by an impartial jury of
the State and district wherein the crime shall have been committed; which district shall have been previously
ascertained by law, and to be informed of the nature and cause of the accusation; to be confronted with the
witnesses against him; to have compulsory process for obtaining witnesses in his favor, and to have the
assistance of counsel for his defense.
Amendment VII (7): Rights in civil cases
In Suits at common law, where the value in controversy shall exceed twenty dollars, the right of trial by jury
shall be preserved, and no fact tried by a jury shall be otherwise re-examined in any Court of the United States,
than according to the rules of the common law.
Amendment VIII (8): Bails, fines, and punishments
Excessive bail shall not be required, nor excessive fines imposed, nor cruel and unusual punishments inflicted.
Amendment IX (9): Rights retained by the people
The enumeration in the Constitution of certain rights shall not be construed to deny or disparage others
retained by the people.
Amendment X (10): Powers retained by the states and the people
The powers not delegated to the United States by the Constitution, nor prohibited by it to the States, are
reserved to the States respectively, or to the people.
BILL OF RIGHTS CHART
AMENDMENTS IN THE UNITED STATES CONSITUTION
ELEMENTARY VERSION
Congress cannot make a law that limits freedom of religion,
free speech, free press, or the right of people to get together
in groups, or the right of people to ask the government to
correct things they don’t like.
The government cannot stop citizens from keeping guns
because the military is necessary to keep peace.
No soldiers can be kept in people’s homes in time of peace,
without the permission of the owner; if in time of war, certain
laws have to be followed.
Citizens have the right to be safe in their houses, their
belongings, and their persons against unreasonable
searches and seizures. If the government wants to search
anything, they must have a search warrant which tells what
they are looking for and where they can search.
No person can be charged with a crime unless the charges
have been brought by a grand jury. A person cannot be
charged with the same crime twice. A person does not have
to testify against himself/herself. A person can’t have his or
her life, his or her property, or his or her freedoms taken
from him or her without being treated fairly by the law. A
person’s property can’t be taken from him or her without
receiving money for the property.
BILL OF RIGHTS CHART
AMENDMENTS IN THE UNITED STATES CONSITUTION
ELEMENTARY VERSION
When a person is accused of a crime, he or she will have a
quick and public trial. The jury will be fair. The accused will
be told what the charge is and can face the people who say
he or she broke the law. The accused can have a lawyer to
help him or her with the case.
When a person sues another person and the amount of
money is over $20.00, the case may be decided by a jury,
and the decision will be final.
Excessive bail or fines cannot be required.
unusual punishment is allowed.
No cruel or
People have other rights that are not listed here.
The powers not given to the national government are given
to individual states.
BILL OF RIGHTS CHART
AMENDMENTS IN THE UNITED STATES CONSITUTION
ELEMENTARY VERSION
Congress cannot make a law that limits freedom of religion,
free speech, free press, or the right of people to get together
in groups, or the right of people to ask the government to
correct things they don’t like.
The government cannot stop citizens from keeping guns
because the military is necessary to keep peace.
No soldiers can be kept in people’s homes in time of peace,
without the permission of the owner; if in time of war, certain
laws have to be followed.
Citizens have the right to be safe in their houses, their
belongings, and their persons against unreasonable
searches and seizures. If the government wants to search
anything, they must have a search warrant which tells what
they are looking for and where they can search.
No person can be charged with a crime unless the charges
have been brought by a grand jury. A person cannot be
charged with the same crime twice. A person does not have
to testify against himself/herself. A person can’t have his or
her life, his or her property, or his or her freedoms taken
from him or her without being treated fairly by the law. A
person’s property can’t be taken from him or her without
receiving money for the property.
BILL OF RIGHTS CHART
AMENDMENTS IN THE UNITED STATES CONSITUTION
ELEMENTARY VERSION
When a person is accused of a crime, he or she will have a
quick and public trial. The jury will be fair. The accused will
be told what the charge is and can face the people who say
he or she broke the law. The accused can have a lawyer to
help him or her with the case.
When a person sues another person and the amount of
money is over $20.00, the case may be decided by a jury,
and the decision will be final.
Excessive bail or fines cannot be required.
unusual punishment is allowed.
No cruel or
People have other rights that are not listed here.
The powers not given to the national government are given
to individual states.
Ballot Box
Bulletin
A Monthly publication of Kids Voting USA June 2012
ChildFund
International Awards
the Chiesman Center
Funds
C
hildFund International US
Program has awarded funding to
the Chiesman Center for Democracy
to implement a project called “Civic
Outreach with Outstanding Leaders”
(COOL).
The Chiesman Center will partner
with Rapid City schools and youth
serving organizations to implement
Kids Voting South Dakota® (KVSD)
and Project Citizen with ChildFund
sponsored children in Rapid City.
Twenty to thirty high school students
from the Rapid City Academy and St.
Thomas More High School will work
with elementary and middle school
students in schools and afterschool
programs in Rapid City. The high
school students will attend training on
leadership skills and KVSD and Project
Citizen programming to prepare them to
work with the younger students.
Under the guidance of mentor
teachers, the high school students will
mentor and coach the younger students
at each of the sites. In the 2012 fall
semester, the high school students
will work with elementary school age
students to implement Kids Voting.
In the 2013 spring semester, the high
school students will work with middle
school age students to implement
Project Citizen.
Don’t forget to follow KVUSA
on Facebook & Twitter!
“
Kids Voting Brownsville Hosts
Art and Multimedia Contests
The Voting Process: Does your voice count?”
was the theme of the Kids Voting Brownsville Spring 2012 Art and Multimedia Contests
that were open to students in all Brownsville
schools.
Winners from among the more than 70
submissions were announced in late April after
being judged by members of the University of
Texas at Brownsville and Texas Southmost College community and members of the Brownsville community.
The contests gave Brownsville students the
opportunity to display their knowledge of civic
Art Contest Division One (grades
responsibilities in creative ways. Elementary
students’ artwork was judged on creativity and K-2) First place Ethan G. Pena,
Resaca Elementary, 2nd grade
adherence to theme. Middle school students’
multimedia projects - included photo stories,
PowerPoint presentations or videos - were judged on creativity, adherence to
theme and effort.
T
Affiliate Takes New Name
he board of directors of Voices in Voting/Kids Voting Greater Las Vegas
recently received Kids Voting USA Board approval
for a slight name change. The southern Nevada affiliate requested permission that the words “Greater Las
Vegas” be changed to “Southern Nevada” which would
clearly designate the vast area of schools being served
within the Clark County School District. This includes
over 350 schools located throughout Las Vegas, North
Las Vegas, Henderson, Boulder City, and Mesquite,
as well as outlying regions within southern Nevada.
It was determined that such a slight name change was
actually necessary due to the fact that board members had often been questioned
whether the southern Nevada organization dealt with teachers and students in
schools located solely within Las Vegas city limits. Board members believe that
this name change will aid in fund raising possibilities. Voices in Voting/Kids
Voting Southern Nevada will continue to provide the Kids Voting curriculum to
elementary and secondary teachers through an online one-credit course as well
as student online voting opportunities for over 300,000 K-12 southern Nevada
students during local and national elections.
Kids Voting USA, 5423 S.W. 7th, Topeka, KS 66606 • www.kidsvotingusa.org • (785) 271-6350
Kids Voting USA, 5423 S.W. 7th, Topeka, KS 66606 • www.kidsvotingusa.org • (785) 271-6350
Other News
June
Educator of the Month
VUSA is pleased to announce that Felix Catheline is the June Educator
K
of the Month. Mr. Catheline is the AP Government Teacher for
Columbus South High School, which is part of Kids Voting Central Ohio.
Felix is the point person at South High School for all Kids Voting programs,
including the DoubleClick mock election, the Kids Voting Youth Summit,
the Youth at the Booth program and the Youth Council. Additionally, Mr.
Catheline’s class attended this year’s Naturalization ceremony and registered
91 new citizens to vote.
Kids Voting USA truly appreciates the work and passion Mr. Felix
Catheline demonstrates for our program.
O
5K Freedom Run/Walk
n April 28th, Kids Voting Mesa County hosted the 5K Freedom Run/
Walk at the Western Colorado Botanical Gardens along the Colorado
River. Approximately 80 runners and walkers
attended this event. The event was filled with sun,
amazing spirit of the participants and volunteers
and post-run music and run. The affiliate plans to
host this fundraiser and awareness event again in the
future.
New Citizens New Voters
ids Voting of Central Ohio was part of the annual Naturalization
K
Ceremony conducted by the United States District Court in Columbus
Ohio on May 14, 2012. Although the court swears in new citizens every
month, once a year they hold a special Naturalization Ceremony at the Ohio
Historical Center. This year 145 new citizens from 51 different countries
became citizens of the United States.
The oldest was 77 and the youngest
was 18.
After the new citizens each
introduced themselves and named
their country of origin, Federal
Judge James L. Graham swore
them in. The new citizens heard
a speech by Keith L. Bennett,
Assistant Director of the FBI, and
were treated to a reception put on by the Columbus Bar Association. Kids
Voting students from Columbus South High School, accompanied by their
AP Government Teacher Felix Catheline, registered the new citizens to vote.
Ninety-one registrations were completed and turned in to the Board
of Elections. Many new citizens took the registration form with them to
complete later and mail in. South High student Makala Declouet observed
that she would also be voting for the first time this year, and that she shared
the enthusiasm of the new citizens for this important exercise of democracy.
KVUSA Board of Directors
Diana Carlin, Ph. D.
Chairman
Associate Vice President for Graduate
Education & Professor of Communication,
Saint Louis University
[email protected]
Marty Petty
Vice Chair
Chief Executive Officer
Creative Loafing
[email protected]
Javier J. Aldape
Chicago, IL
[email protected]
Katie Biggie
KV Western New York
[email protected]
Bobby Fox
KV Tampa Bay
[email protected]
Geoffrey J. Gonella
Founder/President
Cornerstone Government Affairs, LLC
[email protected]
Peter Harkness
Publisher Emeritus
Governing
[email protected]
Mark Morneau
V.P./Information Technology
Gannett Co., Inc.
[email protected]
Linda Reeves
Board Member
Kids Voting Mesa County
[email protected]
Alex Ross
Student
Kansas University
[email protected]
Ron Thornburgh
Senior VP of Business Development
NIC Inc
[email protected]
Rachel Willis
Executive Director
[email protected]
KVUSA is managed by KPA.
Ballot Box
Bulletin
A Monthly publication of Kids Voting USA June 2012
ChildFund
International Awards
the Chiesman Center
Funds
C
hildFund International US
Program has awarded funding to
the Chiesman Center for Democracy
to implement a project called “Civic
Outreach with Outstanding Leaders”
(COOL).
The Chiesman Center will partner
with Rapid City schools and youth
serving organizations to implement
Kids Voting South Dakota® (KVSD)
and Project Citizen with ChildFund
sponsored children in Rapid City.
Twenty to thirty high school students
from the Rapid City Academy and St.
Thomas More High School will work
with elementary and middle school
students in schools and afterschool
programs in Rapid City. The high
school students will attend training on
leadership skills and KVSD and Project
Citizen programming to prepare them to
work with the younger students.
Under the guidance of mentor
teachers, the high school students will
mentor and coach the younger students
at each of the sites. In the 2012 fall
semester, the high school students
will work with elementary school age
students to implement Kids Voting.
In the 2013 spring semester, the high
school students will work with middle
school age students to implement
Project Citizen.
Don’t forget to follow KVUSA
on Facebook & Twitter!
“
Kids Voting Brownsville Hosts
Art and Multimedia Contests
The Voting Process: Does your voice count?”
was the theme of the Kids Voting Brownsville Spring 2012 Art and Multimedia Contests
that were open to students in all Brownsville
schools.
Winners from among the more than 70
submissions were announced in late April after
being judged by members of the University of
Texas at Brownsville and Texas Southmost College community and members of the Brownsville community.
The contests gave Brownsville students the
opportunity to display their knowledge of civic
Art Contest Division One (grades
responsibilities in creative ways. Elementary
students’ artwork was judged on creativity and K-2) First place Ethan G. Pena,
Resaca Elementary, 2nd grade
adherence to theme. Middle school students’
multimedia projects - included photo stories,
PowerPoint presentations or videos - were judged on creativity, adherence to
theme and effort.
T
Affiliate Takes New Name
he board of directors of Voices in Voting/Kids Voting Greater Las Vegas
recently received Kids Voting USA Board approval
for a slight name change. The southern Nevada affiliate requested permission that the words “Greater Las
Vegas” be changed to “Southern Nevada” which would
clearly designate the vast area of schools being served
within the Clark County School District. This includes
over 350 schools located throughout Las Vegas, North
Las Vegas, Henderson, Boulder City, and Mesquite,
as well as outlying regions within southern Nevada.
It was determined that such a slight name change was
actually necessary due to the fact that board members had often been questioned
whether the southern Nevada organization dealt with teachers and students in
schools located solely within Las Vegas city limits. Board members believe that
this name change will aid in fund raising possibilities. Voices in Voting/Kids
Voting Southern Nevada will continue to provide the Kids Voting curriculum to
elementary and secondary teachers through an online one-credit course as well
as student online voting opportunities for over 300,000 K-12 southern Nevada
students during local and national elections.
Kids Voting USA, 5423 S.W. 7th, Topeka, KS 66606 • www.kidsvotingusa.org • (785) 271-6350
Kids Voting USA, 5423 S.W. 7th, Topeka, KS 66606 • www.kidsvotingusa.org • (785) 271-6350
Other News
June
Educator of the Month
VUSA is pleased to announce that Felix Catheline is the June Educator
K
of the Month. Mr. Catheline is the AP Government Teacher for
Columbus South High School, which is part of Kids Voting Central Ohio.
Felix is the point person at South High School for all Kids Voting programs,
including the DoubleClick mock election, the Kids Voting Youth Summit,
the Youth at the Booth program and the Youth Council. Additionally, Mr.
Catheline’s class attended this year’s Naturalization ceremony and registered
91 new citizens to vote.
Kids Voting USA truly appreciates the work and passion Mr. Felix
Catheline demonstrates for our program.
O
5K Freedom Run/Walk
n April 28th, Kids Voting Mesa County hosted the 5K Freedom Run/
Walk at the Western Colorado Botanical Gardens along the Colorado
River. Approximately 80 runners and walkers
attended this event. The event was filled with sun,
amazing spirit of the participants and volunteers
and post-run music and run. The affiliate plans to
host this fundraiser and awareness event again in the
future.
New Citizens New Voters
ids Voting of Central Ohio was part of the annual Naturalization
K
Ceremony conducted by the United States District Court in Columbus
Ohio on May 14, 2012. Although the court swears in new citizens every
month, once a year they hold a special Naturalization Ceremony at the Ohio
Historical Center. This year 145 new citizens from 51 different countries
became citizens of the United States.
The oldest was 77 and the youngest
was 18.
After the new citizens each
introduced themselves and named
their country of origin, Federal
Judge James L. Graham swore
them in. The new citizens heard
a speech by Keith L. Bennett,
Assistant Director of the FBI, and
were treated to a reception put on by the Columbus Bar Association. Kids
Voting students from Columbus South High School, accompanied by their
AP Government Teacher Felix Catheline, registered the new citizens to vote.
Ninety-one registrations were completed and turned in to the Board
of Elections. Many new citizens took the registration form with them to
complete later and mail in. South High student Makala Declouet observed
that she would also be voting for the first time this year, and that she shared
the enthusiasm of the new citizens for this important exercise of democracy.
KVUSA Board of Directors
Diana Carlin, Ph. D.
Chairman
Associate Vice President for Graduate
Education & Professor of Communication,
Saint Louis University
[email protected]
Marty Petty
Vice Chair
Chief Executive Officer
Creative Loafing
[email protected]
Javier J. Aldape
Chicago, IL
[email protected]
Katie Biggie
KV Western New York
[email protected]
Bobby Fox
KV Tampa Bay
[email protected]
Geoffrey J. Gonella
Founder/President
Cornerstone Government Affairs, LLC
[email protected]
Peter Harkness
Publisher Emeritus
Governing
[email protected]
Mark Morneau
V.P./Information Technology
Gannett Co., Inc.
[email protected]
Linda Reeves
Board Member
Kids Voting Mesa County
[email protected]
Alex Ross
Student
Kansas University
[email protected]
Ron Thornburgh
Senior VP of Business Development
NIC Inc
[email protected]
Rachel Willis
Executive Director
[email protected]
KVUSA is managed by KPA.
Kids Voting USA Brownsville an Outreach of the
Center for Civic Engagement
The University of Texas at Brownsville
Patriotism Alive! Rock the Vote- Professional Development
Tuesday, July 24, 2012 – Elementary Campus Representatives
Wednesday, July 25, 2012 – Secondary Campus Representatives
8 a.m. – 12 noon
Salón Cassia, UTB Education and Business Complex
Agenda
8:00
Registration
8:30
Welcome: Shamina Davis, Director, Center for Civic Engagement
8:40
Kids Voting Overview
9:00
Kids Voting Access
a. Curriculum
b. Sample Activities
c. Campus Selections for September Training
d. Campus Voting Process and Ballot Description
e. Campus Questions for Candidates
10:00
DoubleClick Democracy Webinar
11:00
Celebrate Freedom Week Resources
a. Declaration of Independence
b. Constitution
c. Bill of Rights
11:30
Closure
1301 E. Madison St. • Cueto Building • Brownsville, Texas 78520 • 956-882-4308 • Fax 956-882-4309 • utb.edu/cce
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